Georgia lynching victims remembered as racial reconciliation efforts expand

first_img Kay Bell says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Racial Justice & Reconciliation Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest April 11, 2017 at 7:48 pm Please also read “Blood at the Root” by Patrick Phillips as you work for racial reconciliation in Georgia. Though I don’t live there now, I have a long family history from Forsyth County. But this is a story that was never told within the family or community to our great shame. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET By David PaulsenPosted Apr 11, 2017 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Jobs & Calls Press Release Service Rector Belleville, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Georgia lynching victims remembered as racial reconciliation efforts expand New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Press Release Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Advocacy Peace & Justice, center_img Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Comments are closed. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Hopkinsville, KY April 11, 2017 at 4:44 pm “The Cross and the Lynching Tree,” by James H. Cone, was the focus of our 2017 Lenten Book Reading at New Song Episcopal in Coralville, Iowa. The book was painful to read, but well worth it, for it gave us all (about 15 participants) a chance to empathize with the terror that African Americans felt. It also helped us to understand why many African Americans are reticent, even today, to participate in the healing process. Nevertheless, we must all continue to persist. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Washington, DC Featured Events Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Jim Conger says: Rector Albany, NY A historical marker remembering lynching victims in Georgia is unveiled on March 18 in LaGrange. Photo courtesy of Wesley Edwards[Episcopal News Service] In one of the darkest corners of American history – the lynching of black victims by white attackers – details of many of these decades-old killings have long remained a mystery as present-day researchers seek to identify the victims and bring racial healing to their communities.Those efforts have gained steam in Georgia, where last year the Episcopal Diocese of Atlanta launched a three-year series of pilgrimages intended to bring these victims and their stories to light. At the same time, a group of residents in one west-central Georgia community, LaGrange, has been working with police, civic leaders and churches to come to grips with a nearly forgotten lynching in their city.“The wind of the spirit is blowing … and moving us to the realization that in order [for] racial healing to occur then we have to deal with lynching,” said Catherine Meeks, who heads the Diocese of Atlanta’s Beloved Community: Commission for Dismantling Racism.Meeks praises the work of the LaGrange group, named Troup Together, after Troup County, where the town is located. The diocese and Troup Together are pursuing separate but parallel efforts with similar goals: to remember lynching victims, reveal their untold stories and encourage racial reconciliation.Nearly two years of work by Troup Together culminated in January in a public apology issued by Police Chief Lou Dekmar for his department’s role in the lynching of Austin Callaway in 1940. Callaway was found gravely injured on the side of a highway after being taken from a cell at the LaGrange jail by a white mob, an injustice enabled by LaGrange officers.And in March, white pastors spoke at a church service to confess white congregations’ complicity in Callaway’s death and other acts of racial violence. That service was followed by a dedication of a historical marker at Warren Temple United Methodist Church and a cemetery service for Callaway and more than 500 lynching victims in Troup County and around the state.St. Mark’s Episcopal Church is among several LaGrange congregations working with Troup Together. The church hosted a luncheon for Callaway’s relatives and those of two other lynching victims before they attended the church service in March.“While we can’t change [the past], we can acknowledge the horror of it and regret it and make our atonement,” said Janet Beall, a retired educator and longtime member of St. Mark’s who attended the ceremonies along with St. Mark’s rector, the Very Rev. R. Allen Pruitt.Troup Together evolved from a biracial faith community in LaGrange called Alterna that two years ago read and discussed “The Cross and the Lynching Tree,” a 2011 book by James H. Cone. The group’s subsequent research into local history turned up information on the lynching of Callaway. That led to a prayer service in September 2015 marking 75 years since the killing. The reconciliation efforts have grown from there.“Our goal is to learn to love our neighbors, and I find that we really can’t do that in any meaningful way unless we know each other’s stories,” said Wesley Edwards, one of the leaders of Troup Together. “Even though we live in the same community we don’t share the same histories as racial groups, and there’s a lot that we don’t know or appreciate across the boundaries of race about each other.”Cone’s book draws a direct parallel between Jesus’ death on the cross and the deep suffering of American blacks that continued after slavery into what he identifies as “the lynching era,” 1880 to 1940.“In that era, the lynching tree joined the cross as the most emotionally charged symbols in the African American community,” Cone says. “Both the cross and the lynching tree represented the worst in human beings and at the same time ‘an unquenchable ontological thirst’ for life that refuses to let the worst determine our final meaning.”In segregated communities across the South, the intended message of a lynching was fear, Meeks said.“The purpose of it was to terrorize black people and any white people who were going to sympathize with black people, so lynching was about terror,” Meeks said. Its roots were in a thread of American society that held a belief in white supremacy, she said, “and that same white supremacy thread continues to haunt us in this country.”The Commission on Dismantling Racism, whose anti-racism training program has served as a model for other Episcopal dioceses, is working to honor the 600 or so people documented to have died from lynching in Georgia. Its first pilgrimage, in October, brought nearly 200 people to Macon, Georgia, and the site where in 1922 a lynch mob dumped the body of John “Cockey” Glover.The commission has a busy 2017 planned. A second pilgrimage is set for Athens this October, Meeks said, and her commission is working to open a center for racial healing near Morehouse College in Atlanta by that month. The commission also is encouraging parishes in the diocese to hold screenings of the movie “13th,” about racial injustice in the American prison system.Meeks and her team also want to establish a permanent memorial to Georgia’s lynching victims that incorporates the list of names, similar to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. Meeks is in contact with the Center for Civil and Human Rights in Atlanta as one possible location.“There is great interest in this idea,” Meeks said, estimating a two-year timeframe for the project to come together.There are plenty of victims to remember, including some whose precise fate remains unknown.Bobbie Hart, one of the Troup Together leaders, never knew her paternal grandfather. He vanished decades ago while working on the railroad, and the more Hart and her sister learned about him and his mysterious disappearance the more they became convinced that he had been the victim of a lynching.Hart, who was raised Baptist and now attends a Methodist church, knows relatives of Austin Callaway but was unaware of the lynching until working on Troup Together with Edwards. She was overcome with emotion while attending the group’s prayer service for Callaway in 2015.“I felt a sadness come over me and I prayed and I felt the need to ask the Lord to forgive the men that did this to them,” Hart, now 64, said. “And I felt that it was important that, me being a black female … I chose to forgive this injustice.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Submit an Event Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Tags Comments (2) Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Job Listinglast_img read more

Bulgarian TV broadcaster censors political cartoons

first_img February 11, 2021 Find out more News BulgariaEurope – Central Asia Media independence Freedom of expression Reporters Without Borders (RSF) regards the removal of 90 political cartoons by the well-known Bulgarian cartoonist Chavdar Nikolov from the Nova TV website as an unacceptable act of censorship. Owned by Swedish media group MTG and run by a Frenchman, Didier Stoessel, Sofia-based Nova TV removed all the cartoons and an interview with Nikolov from its website on 14 April. Nova TV said they were removed because its contract with Nikolov had ended but it seems to be a case of political censorship, coming as it did just days after the latest cartoon mocked Prime Minister Boyko Borisov for publicly supporting a group of criminals who hunt down migrants in order to send them back to Turkey.“A media outlet’s management has a duty to maintain the editorial independence of the journalists who work for it,” RSF said. “Didier Stoessel’s claim that the cartoonist’s contract had simply ended is grotesque. The media must participate in the democratic debate, which includes this kind of cartoon. Media freedom is not a trite formula. It is incredible that media outlets must be reminded of their duty to respect it. All of Nikolov’s cartoons must be restored to the website.”Nova TV’s censorship has sparked an outcry in Bulgaria and was immediately denounced on social networks. A demonstration was held yesterday in Sofia. News RSF and 60 other organisations call for an EU anti-SLAPP directive Bulgaria’s general election: RSF publishes 10 proposals to rescue press freedom March 10, 2021 Find out more Follow the news on Bulgaria Help by sharing this information Organisation April 16, 2016 Bulgarian TV broadcaster censors political cartoons Bulgaria: RSF condemns refusal to investigate reporter’s violent arrest BulgariaEurope – Central Asia Media independence Freedom of expression News to go further Receive email alerts News RSF_en December 2, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

Tom Brady hasn’t even signed with the Bucs and 5,000 fans are already in line for season tickets

first_imgCurrent #Bucs website to buy season tickets…and growing 😂 pic.twitter.com/zf50tGnyyJ— Anthony Becht (@Anthony_Becht) March 17, 2020Less than three hours later, that number climbed well over 5,000. That’s more than 10 percent of the Bucs’ average attendance in 2019.This is what the line looks like for Bucs season tickets right now. Keep in mind, this organization averaged under 52,000 per game last season in attendance. pic.twitter.com/3mpqpvg9Oe— JennaLaineESPN (@JennaLaineESPN) March 18, 2020It’s worth reiterating: Brady hasn’t officially signed the contract yet. But that’s how excited Tampa Bay fans are to get back to winning football. IYER: How the Buccaneers became Brady’s best fit in his quest to win without PatriotsIt’s that winning resume, paired with Tampa Bay’s already talented roster, that has rejuvenated Bucs fans. So much so that they were all clamoring to buy At about 7 p.m. ET there were nearly 1,000 people virtually in line for tickets on Ticketmaster. That’s a pretty healthy number for the team that ranked 30th in average home attendance (51,898) last year. It has been 13 seasons since the Buccaneers last made the playoffs, led by coach Jon Gruden and quarterback Jeff Garcia. It’s safe to say that Tampa Bay fans haven’t had much to cheer about since then, with the Bucs compiling a 71-121 record during their post-2007 playoff drought. But it looks like that all could change very soon with the imminent arrival of Tom Brady.Brady, unlike the Bucs’ franchise, has a history of winning unlike any quarterback in NFL history. In 19 seasons as a starter with the Patriots, he amassed a 219-64 record, meaning he could lose 283 more games and still have a better winning percentage than Tampa Bay over its 44-year history (267-424-1,.387).last_img read more