USS Benfold, Milius and Barry to Join U.S. Navy’s 7th Fleet in Yokosuka, Japan

first_img View post tag: Naval View post tag: USS View post tag: U View post tag: join The U.S. Navy has announced that the ballistic missile defense (BMD)-capable guided-missile destroyers USS Benfold (DDG 65) and USS Milius (DDG 69) will become part of the Forward Deployed Naval Forces (FDNF) based at Commander, Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan.Benfold and Milius will leave their current homeport of San Diego and forward deploy to Yokosuka in the summers of 2015 and 2017, respectively. The move directly supports the announcement made by Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel in April of this year that the Navy would commit to sending two additional BMD-capable ships to the defense of Japan by 2017.The Navy also announced that the guided missile destroyer USS Barry (DDG 52) will conduct a hull swap with USS Lassen (DDG 82) and become a member of the Forward Deployed Naval Forces (FDNF) in early 2016. USS Barry will forward deploy from its current homeport of Norfolk, Va. while USS Lassen will return to the U.S. and homeport in Mayport, Fla.Barry, Benfold, and Milius will all complete a midlife modernization, making them among the most capable ships of their class. All will be fitted with the latest Aegis Baseline 9 combat system which includes state of the art air defense, ballistic missile defense, surface warfare and undersea warfare capabilities.The three Flight I ships will also receive upgrades including a fully-integrated bridge, improved machinery, damage control and quality of life improvements, an advanced galley and commercial-off-the-shelf computing equipment.These U.S. BMD-capable forces, combined with the sea-based missile defense systems operated by their counterparts in the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force, as well as the new TPY-2 radar at Kyogamisaki scheduled to start operations later this year, provide the U.S.-Japan alliance a regionally responsive missile defense capability.[mappress mapid=”14089″]Press release; Image: U.S. Navy Authorities View post tag: Navy USS Benfold, Milius and Barry to Join U.S. Navy’s 7th Fleet in Yokosuka, Japan View post tag: Milius View post tag: Japan View post tag: 7th Back to overview,Home naval-today USS Benfold, Milius and Barry to Join U.S. Navy’s 7th Fleet in Yokosuka, Japan View post tag: Benfold View post tag: Yokosuka October 17, 2014 View post tag: fleet View post tag: Barry View post tag: S Share this articlelast_img read more

Tropical cyclones are nearing land more, except in Atlantic

first_imgA new study finds that tropical cyclones around the globe are getting closer to land than previously, except for Atlantic hurricanes. Thursday’s study finds that these storms, also called typhoons, are moving about 18 miles closer to land and people every decade since 1982. Scientists aren’t sure why this is happening. Nor do they understand why it’s happening all over except in the Atlantic. And they find it even more puzzling that while storms seem to be getting closer to land, they don’t seem to be hitting land significantly more.last_img

Boeing eyes production pause as virus spreads: Sources

first_imgTopics : As cases rise, so too have angst and anger among some rank-and-file machinists, insiders say. A number of workers have used an “Imminent Danger, Stop Work” contract clause to halt specific jobs until safety concerns are addressed.One 777 work crew was sent home earlier this week due to concerns of infection, and mechanics on the next shift refused to work on the same jet because they were not sure the area was cleaned properly, one person with knowledge of the matter said.Confirming a Reuters report, Boeing said last week it was freezing hiring and industry sources have said layoffs or furloughs are likely as virus concerns peak.Boeing suppliers, already reeling from a production halt on Boeing’s 737 line due to a year-old safety ban, face an even slimmer workload as flight cancellations mean less airline demand for spare parts and services.Aircraft parts shortages were likely, while productivity could take another blow from enforced minimum distances between workers inside factories, industry sources say.Boeing representatives have been contacting parts suppliers to remind them to follow guidance from US health officials, gather information on personnel and contingency plans, and warn firms to restrict visitors while also meeting contractual obligations, supplier sources said.Airbus plans to resume output at French and Spanish plants on March 23 but industry sources say there are doubts over how long either planemaker can maintain the previous levels of output because of scattered shortages in the supply chain. Boeing Co is leaning toward a temporary work stoppage at its twin-aisle jetliner factories due to the spread of coronavirus, people familiar with the matter said on Thursday, echoing a similar move by European rival Airbus SE.The US planemaker has not made a final decision on the timing and duration of a potential work stoppage as it weighs health guidance and broader impacts to its supply chain.Boeing would use a stoppage of a few days to conduct a deep clean of its Washington state and South Carolina twin-aisle factories, but seems broadly committed for now to keeping production lines running after the suspension, the people said.center_img A Boeing spokesman declined to comment.The fast-spreading coronavirus has disrupted life across the United States, hammering the economy and virtually wiping out air travel demand.Airbus announced plans earlier this week to halt operations at its plants in France and Spain for four days, after Reuters reported it was studying plans to slow or halt production.Boeing, which employs 70,000 people in Seattle’s Puget Sound area, has some 14 confirmed coronavirus cases as of Thursday, many reported at its Everett hub north of Seattle.last_img read more