Port of Antwerp Orders World’s First Hydrogen-Powered Tug

first_imgBelgium’s Port of Antwerp has contracted Antwerp-based Compagnie Maritime Belge (CMB) for the construction of the world’s first tug powered by hydrogen.Dubbed Hydrotug, the vessel will be driven by combustion engines that burn hydrogen in combination with diesel.Construction is due to begin shortly and the Hydrotug is expected to be operational within two years, the port said.“We are working towards becoming a CO2-neutral port,” Jacques Vandermeiren, Port of Antwerp CEO, commented.“With this world-first we aim to further prepare the way for alternative fuels such as hydrogen, in order to realize the transition to alternative, renewable sources of energy.”The hybrid tug contract for CMB follows the construction of the “Hydroville” shuttle, a dual-fuel passenger ferry with limited capacity and power that is now being used for sustainable commuter transport within the port area.CMB is also working with Japanese shipbuilder Tsuneishi Facilities & Craft (TFC) on the construction a hydrogen-powered ferry. The ship will be built at TFC’s facilities in Onomichi, Japan, and is expected to be delivered in 2021.The company earlier teamed up with the Ghent-based engine builder ABC to set up the BeHydro joint venture with the aim of further developing the technology for medium-speed engines with higher power output.“We are convinced of the potential of hydrogen as the key to sustainable shipping and making the energy transition of a reality,” Alexander Saverys, CEO of Compagnie Maritime Belge, said. “The expertise that we acquire with the Hydrotug will enable us to further develop the use of hydrogen as a ship’s fuel.”Compagnie Maritime Belge & Port of Antwerp bouwen #hydrotug, eerste op #waterstof aangedreven sleepboot ter wereld. Belangrijke stap in de transitie naar een duurzame en CO2-neutrale haven. https://t.co/59sMdmElqE#energietransitie #duurzaamheid #innovatie #wereldprimeur pic.twitter.com/TbYXSQmlbx— Port of Antwerp (@PortofAntwerp) September 20, 2019last_img read more

IT Ministry may back storage curbs for critical sensitive data not for

first_imgNew Delhi: The IT Ministry is likely to propose that personal information which neither qualifies as ‘critical’ nor ‘sensitive’ should be allowed to be stored and processed anywhere, while data classified as ‘critical’ should be kept only in India under the draft Personal Data Protection Bill. The proposal is significant as it marks a departure from the original draft of the Personal Data Protection Bill, which had recommended that copy of all personal data should be stored in the country. The tweaking of this provision, if accepted, will spell a relief for companies. Also Read – Thermal coal import may surpass 200 MT this fiscalThe draft Data Protection Bill submitted by Justice B N Srikrishna committee last year had also suggested that personal data that is of ‘critical’ nature should mandatorily be stored only in India, a stance that will be backed by the IT Ministry. According to a government official, the IT Ministry is, however, of the view that not all personal data needs to be stored in India, and only critical and sensitive data should be kept here. While ‘critical’ personal data should be mandatorily stored only in India, ‘sensitive’ personal information should be stored and processed in India but permitted to be transferred outside the country, the official pointed out. Also Read – Food grain output seen at 140.57 mt in current fiscal on monsoon boostThe IT ministry feels that there are adequate safeguards in the proposed Bill and even if a copy of all personal data is not stored in India, such information will anyway be governed by the stringent provisions of the data protection law, including penalty in event of a breach. After the Justice Srikrishna panel submitted its draft version of the Bill, the IT Ministry had sought public feedback on the provisions, and fine-tune the proposed document. The draft legislation will now be placed before the Cabinet, after which it will be introduced in Parliament. The official said the change in the clause pertaining to all kinds of personal data was primarily driven by industry feedback – both Indian and global companies – which argued that maintaining one copy of all information may become cumbersome, expensive and increase compliance burden on firms. “Most important change is that the original draft said that a copy of all personal data should be stored in India…ultimately, the Cabinet will take a call on the matter…IT Ministry is proposing that with regard to personal data only such data which is to be categorised as sensitive or critical needs to be stored in India,” the official said. Justice Srikrishna panel – which submitted its report on data protection as well as the draft Personal Data Protection Bill in July 2018 – had recommended that “every data fiduciary shall ensure the storage, on a server or data centre located in India, of at least one serving copy of personal data to which this Act applies”. The original draft had also stated that central government should notify categories of personal data as ‘critical’ that shall only be processed in a server or data centre located in India. The committee left it to the government to define critical personal data. The IT ministry is learnt to be of the view that Data Protection Authority of India – envisaged in the Bill – in consultation with the sector regulators and industry should recommend to the government what kind of personal information qualifies as critical data. The original version defines ‘Sensitive Personal Data’ as personal information related to passwords, financial data, health data, sex life, sexual orientation, biometric data, genetic data, transgender status, and caste or tribe, religious or political affiliation; or other category of data specified by the authority.last_img read more