Local Little League hopeful they can get the ball rolling

first_imgOriginally, Chesna said they were hopeful for a June 1 or June 15 opening date, but with the announcement schools across the state will remain closed for the rest of the academic year, Chesna said it may be pushed back. Chesna said based on the information he’s read, his understanding is if we reach a “Phase Two” level of reopening, recreational sports would be able to open. Chesna called the cancellation of the Little League World Series disappointing, but added playing any type of season would be a win. If there is a season, the league is working to implement new policies to keep the kids safe. Jude Abbadessa is a sophomore at Union-Endicott High School, and was a member of the 2016 Maine-Endwell Little League championship team. Maine-Endwell Little League President Joe Chesna says while the World Series and regional tournaments are canceled, the decision to have a regular season is up to individual states. Jude said being part of that experience changed his life, and it wasn’t just winning that brought he and the team together. TOWN OF UNION (WBNG) — The Little League World Series may be canceled, but there is still hope for a local season to be played. center_img “I was just talking with my brother yesterday when I heard the news. I was like ‘imagine if I never won the Little League World Series. I’d be a different person, I’d have different friends. I’d have a different outlook on life and baseball.” Chesna also said they were exploring a phone app so parents can live stream games, rather than attend in person. “We’re looking at changing our game times to not have as much overlap, different options to have the kids outside the dugout, catchers being more removed from home plate, maybe they have to bat with a mask on.” While the waiting game to play baseball continues, Jude has advice for the young boys and girls hopeful they can have a season. “Keep working hard. It’s a minor setback for a major recovery. Instead of looking for the Little League World Series, strive for the College World Series, Major League World Series. Hit off a tee in your garage, set up a net, keep throwing. Don’t let this make you a worse player, get better.” “Like” Nicole Menner on Facebook and “Follow” her on Twitter.last_img read more

Swiss first pillar fund halts asset sales on funding reprieve

first_imgSwiss social security buffer fund Compenswiss has halted its asset sale programme and reviewed its investment strategy after Swiss voters last year gave the green light for an additional annual CHF2bn (€1.88bn) in financing for the state pension system.Announcing its investment results for 2019, the fund said the extra money, which is dispensed from this year, will plug the gap between benefit payments and income for around four years.As a result, it has been able to put a halt to its divestment programme, which had been running for about two years, initially at a monthly rate of CHF100m and then CHF125m.It also reviewed its investment strategy in light of the financing reprieve. A spokesperson for Compenswiss told IPE it had only adopted limited shifts for 2020, “reflecting a cautious approach in our overall risk assessment”, although the strategy asset allocation could still be amended in the future given the longer time horizon.For 2020 the fund had decided to switch 1% of its foreign fixed income allocation to real estate, “a market traditionally associated with higher returns but lesser liquidity than fixed income,” the spokesperson said.The allocation to real estate has risen to 10% as a result of the shift.Demographics are weighing on the Swiss state pension system. According to a study carried out in 2019 by UBS in conjunction with researchers at the University of Freiburg in Breisgau, pension promises from the state pension – AHV in short in German – exceed the system’s future income by about 170% of GDP (base year of 2016).The extra yearly cash injection of CHF2bn stems from a tax and AHV financing reform that was approved in a referendum in May last year, and according to the study it cuts the pension funding shortfall by about 20%.Solutions aimed at the long-term funding equilibrium are being discussed in parliament. The government’s reform proposal, known as AHV21/AVS21, aims to secure the financing of the state pension until 2030, which it has calculated as requiring an additional CHF26bn.10.22% gainCompenswiss’s investments gained a net 10.22% in 2019, with total assets going from CHF34.2bn to CHF36.4bn as at the end of the year. The return is the second highest since the first pillar pension system and the buffer fund were established in 1948.Operating and asset management costs amounted to 0.19% of total assets, in line with the previous year.last_img read more

Senator making another run at traffic camera ban

first_imgA state senator who’s tried for years to ban traffic enforcement cameras in Iowa is making another run at it in 2019.“This is about what I’ve said many times being able to face your accuser, that you are presumed innocent until proven guilty.” Senator Brad Zaun, a Republican from Urbandale, has been trying for a decade to get rid of the cameras that generate tickets for the owners of vehicles caught running red lights or speeding.“I still hear on a weekly basis…from people who are upset about these traffic cameras,” Zaun says. Zaun’s traffic camera ban has again cleared the first procedural hurdle in the Iowa Senate, but Senator Jake Chapman, a Republican from Adel, has taken the baton from Zaun, and is now serving as the manager of the bill. Chapman is the chief operating officer of a private ambulance service in Des Moines and used his company’s G-P-S technology to challenged two traffic camera tickets issued to his vehicles.“We have the technology to fight those, but the common, everyday Iowan does not have bread-crumb trails that they can pull up on their vehicle to show where they were at any particular time and so I’m gravely concerned with how accurate these cameras are,” Chapman says. Senator Tony Bisignano, a Democrat from Des Moines, opposes the traffic cam ban. Bisignano says he’s tired of this annual debate.“We’ve been over this road so many times,” Bisignano says. “…I trust the police chief to do what’s best not only for the public safety, but also safety of his officers.” A House panel is considering a different approach that would establish statewide standards for where traffic cameras may be placed and how the revenue from the tickets may be used.last_img read more