American Bakery Week deemed a success

first_imgNational Sweet American Bakery Week has wrapped up for its second year after bakers nationwide got involved with the event. From 1 to 7 July bakers were encouraged to maximise the popularity of American-inspired sweet treats, with product ideas from across the ponds.Graham Ryder, owner of Peter’s Bakery in Manchester, who has taken part in the awareness week for the last two years, said: “This year we wanted to do even more to celebrate the event. We styled the bakery with red white and blue decorations and opted for a Vegas theme, producing cupcakes topped with chocolate dice, playing cards and even roulette chips – they were a big hit with our customers.”Jacqui Passmore, marketing manager UK and Ireland for Dawn Foods, said: “We were delighted to have more bakers than ever register for this year’s National American Sweet Bakery Week. We’ve received excellent feedback from those who took part in the event, with many reporting incredible sales increases during the week.”Bakers can still get a taste of the USA through Dawn’s wider Authentic American Bakery Campaign. Follow Dawn’s virtual food blogger and bakery enthusiast Dan Jackson’s adventures across the USA as he reports on trends and sends back recipe and theming ideas using Dawn’s American bakery products.Go to www.dawnbakery.co.uk for full details, as well as the chance to enter monthly American-themed competitions and giveaways.last_img read more

IPC adapting to cash flow issues caused by Tokyo 2020 postponement

first_img “Of course we have less income in 2020 due to the postponement.” Parsons added that the IPC had not requested any financial support from the International Olympic Committee (IOC) to combat the cash flow issue, saying the organisation would seek to solve the issue internally. He confirmed that although there were cash flow issues, the IPC had no plans to let staff go. The IPC President also said the organisation were in contact with National Paralympic Committees (NPC) to address issues they may experience during the pandemic or due to the postponement of the Paralympic Games. Several NPCs have paid entry fees and for hotel accommodation at events, which have been impacted by cancellations or postponements. Parsons said the organisation were hopeful that NPCs which have already paid for accommodation for Tokyo 2020 could see their agreement remain in place for their rescheduled Paralympic Games in 2021. “Cancelled events and changed plans come at a cost to our members, who are normally not big and rich organisations,” he said. “They are not immune to the financial problems that come with COVID-19. “Some have already paid entry fees, hotels and tickets for events that have been cancelled so we are helping them with that and liaising with the local organising committees on how some of this money can go back to the National Paralympic Committees. “The best-case scenario is that the hotels where there is already an agreement for this year can offer the same service next year without having to charge a penalty fee.” Parsons thanked athletes and NPCs for their support during the coronavirus pandemic, which has seen more than 1.4 million cases worldwide and over 84,000 deaths. read also:IPC invite nominations for Athletes’ Council elections He said the Paralympic Games, now scheduled for August 24 to September 5 in 2021, could be a “sporting and humanitarian triumph”. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Parsons said the organisation were currently reviewing 150 contracts related to the Paralympic Games, which were rescheduled from 2020 to 2021 earlier this month. He said the IPC had already identified more than €1 million (£877,000/$1 million) in savings, roughly five per cent of their 2020 budget, as they adjust to the postponement of the Games and the impact of the coronavirus pandemic. The IPC 2018 financial report showed a budget of €24 million (£21 million/$26 million). Parsons said broadcast and commercial partners had been supportive of the decision to postpone the Paralympic Games, while adding that he understood why some had asked to delay payments. He stressed that the IPC would not lose money due to the postponement, but admitted the postponement had created a cash flow issue. “Like all businesses we are tremendously affected by the COVID-19 crisis,” Parsons said on a media teleconference today. “One immediate aspect of the Games postponement is a change in the cash flow of the IPC. “This week we have nearly completed an exercise reviewing more than 150 contracts that are Games related and we are embarking on negotiations to best resolve these changes. “One example is the broadcasters. “Some of them have already asked if they can delay final payments to 2021, which we can understand as the product will be delivered in 2021. “All of our partners have been hugely supportive, we had a call with our commercial partners where they asked what they could do to help us and the athletes. “It was really positive to hear this attitude, with the relationships that we have been building for years. International Paralympic Committee (IPC) President, Andrew Parsons, has acknowledged the organisation faces cash flow issues, with some broadcasters seeking to delay payments due to the postponement of the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games. Loading… Promoted ContentThe Funniest Prankster Grandma And Her GrandsonWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?The Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read More8 Superfoods For Growing Hair Back And Stimulating Its Growth7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend Better6 Most Unforgettable Bridges In The World14 Hilarious Comics Made By Women You Need To Follow Right Now8 Things You Didn’t Know About CoffeeWhat Happens To Your Brain When You Play Too Much Video Games?13 kids at weddings who just don’t give a hoot6 Interesting Ways To Make Money With A DroneThis Guy Photoshopped Himself Into Celeb Pics And It’s Hystericallast_img read more