Japanese Device Uses Laser Plasma to Display 3D Images in the Air

first_img Explore further A collaboration of the Japanese National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Keio University and Burton Inc. has produced a device to display “real 3D images” consisting of dot arrays in empty space. Copyright 2006 PhysOrg.com Many previous displays in 3D have been virtual images on 2D planes which, due to human binocular disparity, appear as 3D. However, the limitation of our visual field and the physical discomfort caused by wrongly identifying virtual images makes these displays less than perfect.The new device uses the plasma emission phenomenon near the focal point of focused laser light. By controlling the position of the focal point in the direction of the x-, y-, and z-axes, real 3D-images in air (3D-space) can be displayed. A 3D-object displayed using a 3D-image spatial drawing device. Credit: National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology. Various 2D and 3D objects drawn by the display device. Credit: National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology MEMS-in-the-lens architecture for laser scanning microscopy Citation: Japanese Device Uses Laser Plasma to Display 3D Images in the Air (2006, February 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2006-02-japanese-device-laser-plasma-3d.html Our living space and the objects within it are three-dimensional but while 3D imaging is well documented on the Internet, we don’t see “real 3D-images” on our computer screens. This is because our monitors are unable to display them.Keio University and Burton Inc. noticed that, when laser beams are strongly focused, air plasma emission can only be induced near the focal point. So, they experimented by fabricating a device to display 2D-images in the air. The images are constructed from dot arrays produced by a technique combining a laser light source and galvanometric mirrors. To form 3D-images in the air, the scanning of the focal point in the depth direction along the laser optical axis is essential. However, to do this, the quality of the laser and the technique for varying the position of the focal point must be improved. This explains why we do not yet have the technology to display 3D images.By modifying the 2D image device with a linear motor system and a high-quality and high-brightness infrared pulse, the AIST, Keio University and Burton Inc. created a spatial display of “real 3D images” consisting of dot arrays.The linear motor system can vary the position of the laser focal point by high-speed scanning of a lens set on the motor orbit. Incorporation of this system makes the image scanning in the direction of the z-axis possible. For scanning in the x and y axis directions, conventional galvanometric mirrors are used.The high-quality and high–brightness infrared pulsed laser (repetition frequency of pulse: approximately 100 Hz), enables plasma production to be more precisely controlled, resulting in brighter and higher contrast image drawing. Furthermore, the distance between the device and drawing points can be extended by several meters.The emission time of the laser pulse light is approximately a nanosecond (10-9 sec). The device uses one pulse for each dot. The human eye will recognize the after-image effect of plasma emission from displays up to 100 dot/sec. By synchronizing these pulses and controlling them with software, the device can draw any 3D objects in air. Overview of the 3D-image spatial drawing device. Credit: National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Skype From Startup to 85B in Eight Years

first_img Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Tech giant Microsoft Corp. announced this week that it plans to buy internet calling service Skype for a whopping $8.5 billion in cash. But this isn’t the first time a company has ponied up major dollars for Skype since it was founded by two European entrepreneurs more than eight years ago.A quick history of the company and its founders follows.Aug. 2003: Niklas Zennstrom and Janus Friis, the entrepreneurs who founded file-sharing service Kazaa in the early 2000s, start a service that allows users to make voice calls over the Internet. They call the Luxembourg-based business Skype. Oct. 2005: After gaining traction with users, Skype is purchased by eBay for approximately $2.5 billion, plus potential performance-based consideration.April 2006: Skype says it has reached more than 100 million registered users — nearly double the users it had the previous year.May 2007: Zennstrom and Friis launch peer-to-peer online TV service Joost. The pair are said to raise as much as $45 million in funding.Oct. 2007: Zennstrom steps down as CEO of Skype, becoming nonexecutive chairman. In 2007, Skype generates $382 million in revenues and claims to have 276 million users. However, eBay says it will incur a $1.4 billion “impairment” due, in part, to a $530 million earn-out payment to Skype shareholders.Feb. 2008: Replacing Zennstrom, eBay names Shopping.com CEO Josh Silverman as chief executive of Skype.March 2009: Skype is expected to double its revenue to more than $1 billion in 2011, eBay says.Nov. 2009: Following an announcement the previous month, eBay officially sells a 70 percent stake of Skype to an investor group led by private-equity firm Silver Lake Partners and others including venture-capital firm Andreessen Horowitz. Founders Zennstrom and Friis join the investor group. Separately, Zennstrom and Friis sell Joost to Santa Monica, Calif.-based content network Adconion Media Group for an undisclosed amount.June 2010: Zennstrom and Friis launch online jukebox service Rdio. August 2010: Skype files for an initial public offering, reportedly seeking to raise as much as $1 billion. The company says it generated more than $406 million in revenues through the first half of the year.Oct. 2010: Tony Bates, a former Cisco Enterprise, Commercial and Small Business Group senior vice president and general manager, is named Skype’s CEO.May 2011: After delaying its IPO, rumors begin to fly. Facebook and Google are said to separately consider buying Skype: A deal is said to be valued at $3 billion to $4 billion.Not long after, Microsoft swoops in and agrees to buy the company for $8.5 billion in cash. Skype says it had 170 million users who racked up more than 207 billion minutes of voice and video conversations in 2010.The investor group that sold Skype to Microsoft is said to pull in a total capital gain of more than $5 billion on the sale. Register Now » May 12, 2011 Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. min readlast_img read more