Singing for heroes

first_imgThe aim is for the song to be listened to by as many people as possible ahead of the world cup in the hope that it will become a world cup anthem when it is made available on iTunes, Amazon and all other digital outlets. The single will be launched at the London Double Header on 3 September.Click here for a sneak preview of the song! Ryan Lamb can be heard singing on the Rugby for Heroes singleRugby for Heroes is hoping to get to number one with their charity single featuring Aviva Premiership stars and players from the RAF, Army and Navy.The sportsmen met up at Twickenham in July to record the video for the song, which has had contributions from music industry experts including award-winning songwriter Pete Kirtley.Players involved included England’s Paul Doran Jones and Anthony Allen, Worcester’s Andy Goode and Scotland and Saracens’ Kelly Brown amongst others from clubs across the league.The single will be released on September 4 and hopes to raise money for the charity, which is dedicated to supporting ex-servicemen and women in the Military who have suffered traumatic times and helping to rehabilitate them back into daily life.Since being set up earlier this year the charity has collected the proceeds from a 2011 calender featuring premiership stars, which was an idea hatched by Northampton-bound Ryan Lamb and Anthony Allen who were team mates at Gloucester. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Now Lamb, together with his father Alan, is responsible for rallying the troops for the latest musical fundraiser.The song will be released even before the charity’s official launch, which is set to take place at Twickenham after the world cup.last_img read more

Aviva Premiership & RaboDirect Pro12: Winners and Losers

first_imgLosersCardiff BluesLeaving the RDS field at half-time, the Blues found themselves behind, a long way behind, 40-3 to be exact. Three second half tries, with two from Lions hopefuls Leigh Halfpenny and Alex Cuthbert helped stifle the rout but Cardiff still came away from Dublin having been walloped  59-22, conceding nine tries in the process. It’s a result that sees Cardiff’s points difference for the season drop to -52, the second worst in the league after bottom club Zebre. Having failed to adequately replace the grizzled experience talismen Xavier Rush, Gethin Jenkins, Paul Tito and Martyn Williams last summer, the Blues are in a downward spiral.Sale SharksFriday’s loss away at Worcester sent Sale to 0/7 in the Aviva Premiership this season, a miserable record that has left supporters disgruntled and DoR Bryan Redpath teetering on the brink. With 20-year old Ross Harrison and 19-year old Tommy Taylor in the front row, the Sharks lack of experience was telling as Worcester’s pack gained the upper hand and Andy Goode did the damage on the scoreboard. Eight points adrift at the foot of the Aviva Premiership, Sale have fewer points this season than Newcastle Falcons did at the same time last year. The visit of a rejuvenated London Irish side this Friday will be a must-win game.Northampton READING, ENGLAND – OCTOBER 28: Tom Casson of Harlequins dives over to score the match winning try during the Aviva Premiership match between London Irish and Harlequins at the Madejski Stadium on October 28, 2012 in Reading, England. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) Lucky bounce: Harlequins centre Tom Casson believed his chance of glory had gone. It hadn’tby Ben ColesTHE EUROPEAN break may have either been an unmitigated success or an unqualified nightmare for the UK’s elite sides, but there was no time to pause and reflect as both domestic leagues returned this weekend. Never short of drama, here are the winners and losers from Round Seven of the Aviva Premiership and RaboDirect Pro12:WinnersTom CassonWhen the ball drops into your hands to score a winning try away from home and you blow it, your reaction will naturally be devastation. Harlequins centre Tom Casson made this very clear after he flopped over the try line with the ball under his chest before throwing it away in disgust. Except, Casson had scored. Trailing London Irish as the clock ticked into the final minute, Ugo Monye’s offload dropped backwards through Casson’s hands, before going forward off his knee. Try given, victory for Harlequins, heartbreak for Irish.Freddie BurnsWhen you’re spurned by your country for upcoming internationals, what better response than to show them what they are missing out on. Freddie Burns did just that against Leicester Tigers on Saturday afternoon for Gloucester, first a sumptuously delicate chip leading to a try for seriously swift Charlie Sharples, then one better as he deftly dinked a ball over the Tigers defence and collected to dab down. What was even more satisfying for Burns is that he doing the business opposite England fly-half Toby Flood. The question seems to be, not if he will make his England debut, but when?Rhys PriestlandThe incumbent Wales fly-half has been feeling the heat in recent months, with a disappointing tour of Australia behind him and Dan Biggar going from strength to strength with the Ospreys. However, on Friday night the Scarlets No 10 showed his big game temperament returning, having the last say in a gritty encounter with Edinburgh at Murrayfield by slotting a 78th minute penalty. A timely boost for both his reputation and confidence. Injuries are beginning to take their toll on Northampton’s season, with only one win now in their last four matches and England stars Ben Foden, Dylan Hartley and now Courtney Lawes all sidelined with injuries. Losing at home to Saracens and old boy Chris Ashton will have stung as Northampton dropped to 4th place in the league. A spicy Midlands derby against Leicester at Welford Road next weekend awaits.Follow Ben Coles on Twitter @bencoles_ LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Doping in rugby: a Rugby World investigation

first_img Keep rugby clean: Players sport anti-doping t-shirts at the 2014 JWC Banned: Kiwi sevens star Lavinia Gould was banned in 2013 for a failed testSTEPHEN WATKINS tells a tale of the Hove RFC scrum-half who admitted his guilt to the authorities after telling his team-mates he had tried to bulk up with pharmaceutical help. His friends, disgusted with his actions, contacted the RFU and the player took his ban with good grace.This is an example of rugby’s culture triumphing over cheating. However, this is an isolated case of one amateur going to his team-mates to see if anyone else was taking banned substances. Testing does not go on at that level. It is easy for someone to stumble into an ill-educated choice, even higher up the levels.Sam Chalmers was caught out taking his Pro SD pills. New Zealand’s Lavinia Gould, who failed a drugs test after playing South Africa in the Women’s World Sevens Series, claimed to have taken a supplement called Jack 3D. In 2006 Argentina’s Martín Bustos Moyano failed a test at the U21 World Cup in France, stanozolol found in his system. He tried, and failed, to prove that a supplement called Glutamina was the reason for his failed test. He was banned for 18 months.With Bustos Moyano, there is a sense of reinvention. Now at Bayonne, the back-three player was capped by the Pumas in 2008, two years after his ban. He last played for Argentina in June 2013.In this respect players like Chalmers have hope. The Scot will be 21 when he is allowed to play rugby again. He can start over. However, due to a change in regulation by WADA, any athlete with a positive test as of 1 January 2015 will be banned for four years rather than the current two, effectively ending many rugby careers altogether. The kid gloves are off.This feature originally appeared in the April 2014 edition of Rugby World. To subscribe to the magazine, visit po.st/RWSub IN MAY 2013, during a Scottish training camp in the lead-up to the Junior World Cup, Melrose fly-half Sam Chalmers was pulled in for a random drugs test – his first drugs test. He gave his urine sample and tried to get on with training. Five weeks later, whilst in the gym, he got the bad news from the SRU: he had failed his test.Chalmers’s story is one that we rarely see in international rugby. A player from one of the IRB’s (now World Rugby) top-ranked nations fails a drugs test and it is not for recreational drugs but for a performance-enhancing substance.Following his positive test, which found the anabolic androgenic steroids stanozolol and methandienone in his system, Chalmers confessed, telling World Rugby’s panel that he had purchased some pills online known as Pro SD in an effort to bulk up. “When the season finished a friend of mine who isn’t involved with rugby told me about it and I stupidly took two weeks’ supply,” the 19-year-old told World Rugby.Last December he told an assembled group of young international athletes from the Scottish Borders and a reporter from the Daily Mail about his idiocy and embarrassment. After years of being told he needed to get bigger and more physical, the slight, diabetic back turned to a quick fix; a magic pill taken only weeks before entering an international camp. He was banned for two years.This cautionary tale made headlines because the young player is the son of ex-Scotland and Lions fly-half Craig Chalmers. It has sent ripples through the amateur game in Scotland. In late September (2013), BBC Scotland ran a story with a 19-year-old playing in the country’s National League who claimed: “Lower leagues? I’d say roughly two people per team are on some sort of substances, a fat-stripping or a bulking supplement or something like that. From the Premiership to the Championship.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSSkip AdAds by Whistleblower: Laurent Benezech playing for France in 1994IN THE course of looking into doping in rugby a handful of elite players, some still competing and some recently retired, were approached to discuss the issue. While some mentioned rumour and persistent changing-room jokes, no source was willing to be quoted, even anonymously, for fear of being recognised.While there is no accusation of any top players doping in this report, there is still an unspoken omertà, where competitors will not risk being the whistleblower or pointing out how authorities can better help athletes or monitor their health. And there are risks in stepping forward.It didn’t make headlines in the UK and Ireland, but in the second half of 2013, a former French international landed in hot water. Former France, Racing Métro and Harlequins prop Laurent Bénézech told the newspaper Le Monde that he believed the retirement of Bayonne back-row François Carillo last season due to a heart condition was linked to the use of Human Growth Hormone (HGH). Carillo strenuously denied the allegation and Provale, the players’ union in France, labelled it insulting to all involved, filing a defamation case against Bénézech.In the month before Provale filed their case, Bénézech also appeared before a senate of the Committee of Inquiry on anti-doping in France. There he alleged that he had been given cortisone against his knowledge during the 1995 World Cup. He presented no proof at this hearing, and has not shown any fresh findings to Provale to date.Bénézech also cast doubts on 2006 Heineken Cup losing finalists Biarritz at the hearing, claiming there was a relationship between several players and one-time Pau and Argentina conditioning coach Alain Camborde, who was found guilty of trafficking doping products – including the WADA-banned substance clenbuterol and some anabolic steroids – and received a suspended three-month sentence. Camborde moved to bring another defamation suit against Bénézech in September, but later dropped the case.Bénézech is not the only former France international to say doping had taken place. Last April (2013) Jean-Pierre Élissalde, a five-cap No 9, claimed to have taken amphetamines twice in his career and that “there were other forms of doping, notably to be able to work harder and put on muscle,” during the 1970s and 1980s. This did not cause an international, or even national, scandal.If there was indeed some grand conspiracy, Bénézech has not found any proof to support his theory. Even Éllisalde is at pains to point out that there was no cabal, no ring of coaches and administrators brandishing needles when he played. It was, he said, an individual choice and since he has become a coach he has seen no evidence of strategic team doping. TAGS: Investigation In the April 2014 edition of Rugby World, we ran the below investigation into the state of doping in rugby. England have filed their annual report since then, but the issues are still relevant. At the top of the game in the higher-tier countries, testing is as up-to-the-minute as the sport can offer. Adding tests and breaking out from the specific testing ‘menu’ offered by WADA is expensive to administer.“Adding tests into the matrix means that we may not be able to do more tests overall,” says Stephen Watkins, the RFU’s anti-doping and illicit drugs programme manager. He cites the example of Erythropoietin (EPO), the red blood cell boosting drug so associated with cheating in cycling, as one where cost must be weighted against probability of cheating.“The example of EPO is a good one. We do test for that, but not always. It’s actually a call by UKAD; we say we want to test for that but don’t tell us. We see Human Growth Hormone as more of a risk than EPO, which is used to get up and do it all again. We ask players to play for 80 minutes, once a week. We don’t ask them to get up and do it on a Sunday, too. So when you are working with a finite budget compromises have to be made.“With EPO, it’s more difficult to detect but our players only run for 25 to 35 minutes a game. I’m not saying it couldn’t be used in union, but you could be a wing and not see a ball all day. Something like HGH increases muscle mass, decreases body fat, and while the affects could be to make your fitness go down, in rugby you are looking at an increase in strength, mass, power. If you’re going to dope we see steroids and HGH as where you are going to do it. That’s what you look for, plus some EPO tests.”Watkins feels that some of the guesswork is removed from testing at the top using data. With rugby so varied, flankers involved a lot while wings may only do a few sprints a game, GPS-tracking data taken from World Rugby and power data from players can help tailor testing as much as budgets will allow.In the perfect world, Watkins would like to see an increased budget push testing down the levels to act as a deterrent. Some testing has been taken from the Aviva Premiership and Championship and into the National Leagues. And just this season around 100 tests have been dedicated to Elite Player Development Groups and academy players. Around a third of those who could be tested will be, though Watkins would like this number to increase.Among all of this, Watkins feels education is increasingly important in an age of widely available supplements. He isn’t the only one.Andy Parkinson lays it out there: “With six packs and tight T-shirts being desirable, we are in the age of normalising supplements.“You walk into a supermarket and there are tubs of creatine in the corner. These aren’t issues for elite athletes, but everyone else. Now, there are a whole variety of reputable companies with clean production lines making supplements, but there is no one monitoring the internet. Someone could do wonderful things in sport, but they have a decision to make.”Former Wales and Lions wing Dafydd James backs this up.“I remember finishing a weights session around five years ago,” he says. “We came out into the car park and someone was selling ‘stuff’ out the boot of their car. I don’t condone drug use and I don’t know anyone stupid enough to try it, but maybe sometimes we take education for granted and temptation is always going to be there for shortcuts.” For the amateur player this is an ill few have the means to fight and even fewer are aware of.In 1997 Springbok lock Johan Ackermann received a two-year ban after nandrolone was found in his urine sample. Talking to Rugby World, the head coach of Super Rugby’s Lions explained that he had taken the banned substance on advice to help him recover from a knee injury.Ackermann now fears that a younger generation of South Africans are just as likely to take shortcuts. “The other challenge out there is for junior players. The pressure from coaches and parents to perform, to be the best or have the best school team is tremendous, then youngsters see their heroes on TV looking pumped up. They believe that they must use something to also play at that level and have the same look.“Unfortunately talent and natural DNA will always win and the kids don’t know that. They are not willing to work hard and follow a good diet, and would rather have something to gain weight fast.“The focus area on educating the kids can increase at school level and all the medical risks of doping can be highlighted more. I’m not sure how it works in the UK but school kids can’t be tested at random in South Africa and that must change, as the focus for doping must move to the ages 16 to 21. If those kids know they will be tested then maybe fewer will take the chance.”SARU are legally only able to test school players in designated periods, namely the famous national provincial youth weeks: the U16 Grant Khomo Week, SARU U18 Academy Week and U18 Craven Week.SARU medical manager Clint Readhead reiterates the need for education, saying: “We pay a lot of attention to anti-doping strategies but it is an issue that is far from limited to rugby or even sport in general. A recent survey of schools in KwaZulu Natal suggested that 63% of schoolchildren who admitted that they had taken steroids or would consider taking a steroid did so or would do so, not to improve performance but simply to look good; nothing to do with sport.“All of this has been fuelled by the availability of banned substances over the internet and current cultural influences.” Warning for the kids: Johan Ackermann wants more testing for kidsTHE WHISTLEBLOWING issue becomes hard if there is no organisation or programme to rail against, only individuals and rumours. It could be professionally dangerous or worthy of ridicule for a player to do so if there are only whispers or suspicions about a team-mate. Much is left to the testers. Talking shop: Felipe Contepomi talks anti-doping at 2014’s ConfExTHERE COULD be questions raised about why so few big names have been caught in the anti-doping net like Chalmers. Why have no superstars tested positive for performance-enhancing drugs? Certainly there has been some opportunity given the number of tests done by World Rugby and WADA.Of course, World Rugby’s remit does not extend to national club competitions. The loose-knit community of international unions are overseen by World Rugby and unions’ own leagues are looked after by themselves, with testing in England, Scotland and Wales overseen by UK Anti-Doping (UKAD) and the Irish Sports Council looking after testing in Ireland.Andy Parkinson, the chief executive of UKAD, has praised World Rugby’s proactive approach to education, which he sees as an important part of the fight against doping. “There is an element of naivety on this subject,” Parkinson tells Rugby World. “You hear people say ‘not in my sport; not in my country.’ But we in the UK aren’t any different. We also see rugby union as having a high risk of potential doping, but we see education as being excellent, with both the IRB (World Rugby) and the RFU. We work with them all around the country, even abroad, testing blood and urine.”Yet it is not all rosy in rugby’s garden, and Parkinson does have stark words. “Doping won’t go away just because you test a group of athletes,” he says. “It is not a fight that we can ever say we’ve won and although we have some relative successes, by the very nature of sport you are going to have athletes who try to cross the line. Things are better than even ten years ago but if people want to cheat they will.“Doping’s a threat to all sports and with widely available pharmaceuticals or with more sophisticated products coming out, we have to keep pace and work on new measures. We also have to drive through the right moral compass.”This may paint a gloomy picture, but Professor David Cowan believes things are not so grim. He is director of the Drug Control Centre at King’s College, London – the site that oversaw testing during the London Olympics in 2012 and where Sam Chalmers’s sample was tested in May last year.Cowan says: “We’re busy. There are new research programmes being executed. I’m very optimistic. When WADA came onto the scene we were operating more on charity, but there is more money going into research. This is a tough job, but a good one.”And on the myth of cheats being one step ahead? “Well, it is better if (performance-enhancing substances) weren’t taken, but our concern is making sure pharmaceuticals are not harmful. WADA-funded research is important to make sure we are at the forefront.”Both parties can agree that money plays an important role. However, one thing Parkinson and UKAD are keen to stress is the human element. “We don’t like prosecuting athletes, but we have to,” he says. “It’s hard for national federations like the RFU, performing a dual role. We test, investigate, sometimes prosecute. But we cannot fight against doping without the help of athletes, coaches, governing bodies and parents as well.“We’ve had instances where we’ve prosecuted and another athlete has said, ‘I could have told you about that.’ We have an anonymous hotline for tips and we would urge athletes to use it if they know anything. We won’t disclose anyone’s identity.”last_img read more

Ireland v Wales – Five Things we learnt

first_imgIreland started well but by the end they were hanging on. However, there were encouraging signs from Schmidt’s patched up side The most divisive man in Irish rugby continues to be the Limerick flyer Simon Zebo. At full-back he was dominated in the air and stuck a kick out on the full when under no real pressure having gone first receiver. He also showed questionable defensive decision-making at times. Correspondingly,  outside Sexton, he was Ireland’s most potent running threat and contributed two superb breaks.Catch me if you can: Simon Zebo was one of Ireland’s best attackersThere’s a tendency among Irish fans to favour those who can do the mundane rather than the extraordinary but it would be remiss to underrate Zebo’s line-breaking ability and timing onto the ball. It’s a skill we lack elsewhere in the team, where the centres are picked for their defensive understanding and Trimble is selected for rib-breaking hits and kick-chase. Zebo poses a risk but a risk we need to take.Expanding by degreesIf England’s win over Scotland was like the World Cup never happened, this game showcased a little more willingness to play rugby. Wales reverted to type a little but there were some encouraging signs that Ireland were looking to expand the template of kick-and-chase that has proved successful – but limiting – so far under Schmidt.Expansive game: Johnny Sexton typified Ireland’s willing to run the ballThere was a desire to run the ball from parts of the pitch they have previously always kicked from, and if they aren’t quite offloading yet, it at least appeared on a handful of occasions like the ball-carrier was looking for the offload before sensing it wasn’t quite on. Ireland ran out of puff and ideas in the second half, but the signs of what they were trying to do were encouraging.Tight concerns By Whiff of CorditeIreland managed a draw in their opening match against Wales, and with the dust settling on the performance and result, the feeling is one of the glass being half full. We were fearful going into the game, so a draw was a better outcome than expected. Blowing a 13-0 lead is usually cause for regret, but in the end it was Ireland who were hanging on, as Wales edged the second half. In short, we’ll take it and move on to ParisA classically Oirish performanceAnyone who recently read Tom English’s No Borders will recognise that this performance could have come at any time in our history. A roaring start, followed by a sticky patch in the middle and hanging on at the end; it’s the classic Oirish template from the amateur era.No quarter given: CJ Stander was superb in a game Ireland could easily have lostWhile much has been made of Schmidt’s mentality sea-change, making Ireland more process-focused, and less reliant on emotion, this was a bit of a throwback to the Deccie Kidney, Warren Gatland or Mick Doyle era. Take your pick from any era in the last 100 years.Back-row positivesThere was plenty of pre-match hullabaloo about Wales’ ritzy twin-openside backrow, but in the end they were dominated by Ireland’s somewhat more mundane workhorses. Despite all the ‘genuine 7s’ being on one team it was Ireland who won the breakdown thanks to their effective clearing technique. Justin Tipuric never quite got his linking game going, and for all his outstanding talent, the criticism against him remains that he can spend too long on the fringes of matches.On the charge: Jamie Heaslip carried hard during the gameFor Ireland, Stander was superb on his debut, Tommy O’Donnell was his usual Stakhanovite self and Jamie Heaslip was probably the best player on the pitch, leading the tackle count and winning hard yards in the tight exchanges. With Sean O’Brien to come back, this unit can get even better. Meanwhile, for Wales, it’s back to the drawing board and the ambitious double No 7 experiment may be put away, with Dan Lydiate potentially returning.Simon Zebo – worth the risk? Ireland go to Paris and should win against a French team that appears to have taken up exactly where they left off. The only concern is that the French could scrummage them off the park. Ireland’s tight five struggled at times, especially on the right hand side of the scrum where Nathan White is a limited player at this level, and Mike McCarthy – for all his good form this season – it’s not certain he has the energy levels for this level of rugby.Sorely missed: MIke Ross’ scrummaging power is much needed in the tightHis main strengths are the heft he brings to scrums and mauls, but Ireland’s maul – despite one very effective rumble – has been largely put on hold, and the scrum struggled badly. It could be that Mike Ross is patched on and wheeled out for 50 minutes of scrummaging, but McCarthy is likely to be retained for now. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Hotshot: Scarlets centre Ioan Nicholas

first_img TAGS: Scarlets RW Verdict: Nicholas became the youngest player to represent the Scarlets (17 years and 134 days) when he turned out v Jersey in August 2015 and he made his Guinness Pro12 debut that September, so he is clearly highly rated.First published in the February 2016 edition of Rugby World magazine. Who are you playing for now?Pontyberem 1sts, Scarlets U18, a bit for Llanelli and for Coleg Sir Gâr. I mostly train with the academy, then play for whoever I can! I’m studying for two A levels as well.What are your aims now?I hope to get picked for Wales U18 by playing well for Scarlets U18. I do feel I’m improving all the time. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Teen talent: Ioan Nicholas on the attack for the Scarlets in August 2016. (Photo: Huw Evans Agency) How did you get into rugby?My father, Adrian, was a wing at Pontyberem and when I wanted to start playing with my friends he coached our team all the way from U7 to U16.What positions have you played?I was outside-half all the way up to U15 then I moved to outside-centre and I’ve been there ever since.Nigel Owens is your cousin, and tweets you good luck messages.Yes. He only lives about a minute away from us, so I see him all the time.When did you first link up with the Scarlets?I went to Scarlets U16 and after I played for Wales U16 I got a Scarlets Academy contract. I played for their U18s last season and this.And you played four first-team matches in August and September (2015).I was asked to do pre-season with the senior squad and I was very surprised, then I had a couple of games before I went back to the U18s and schools rugby. It was very good to be involved and everyone was nice to me. It was a privilege to play with Regan King and be coached by Stephen Jones. Date of birth: 3 April, 1998. Country: Waleslast_img read more

Malcolm Boyd at 90: Still writing, still ‘running,’ still inspiring

first_img June 7, 2013 at 4:54 pm Malcolm and his writing were gifts for me : rookie Episcopal school chaplain, right out of the Peace Corps, in 1972 or so. Thank you, kind and gentle Stirrer Upper. You ran; we jogged. Richard Russell says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Comments (17) June 8, 2013 at 7:19 am One chapter left out of the biography of Malcolm Boyd is the fact that he came to Indianapolis at the invitation of then Bishop John P. Craine, to act as the priest for St. George’s Church, a small parish not far south of downtown. However, Canon Boyd also was active in the beginning of St. Timothy’s parish much further south. It is perhaps appropriate that the St. Timothy’s church building is even now the most contemporary church structure in the Diocese of Indianapolis. Canon Boyd was welcomed there in a visit some years ago. The current rector is the Rev’d Rebecca Nickel. February 28, 2015 at 6:52 pm Fr. Malcolm Boyd died on February 27, 2015. Malcolm Boyd at 90: Still writing, still ‘running,’ still inspiring Rector Knoxville, TN Ellen Hirsch says: Rector Martinsville, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET David Krohne says: By Pat McCaughanPosted Jun 7, 2013 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Patricia Parker says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Bath, NC Comments are closed. Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events August 25, 2013 at 1:59 pm Malcolm was the assistant pastor of Detroit’s Grace Episcopal when I was a teen and an altar boy. I remember once, after service in the downstairs fellowship gathering, when I was on the edge of a conversation with ‘grown ups’. He turned to me, and ask “What do you think about that?” treating me as an equal in the discussion-impressive.And when he served as the pastor, when Father Steins was on vacation, to this largely Black middle class (doctors , lawyers, teachers etc.) flock, he began his sermon with “For Lent, I’m giving up playing games with God”. The collective looking at watches and knowing they were not going to make the first tee in time was priceless. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI September 1, 2013 at 8:38 pm I doubt that you will remember me from your days as Episcopal chaplain at Wayne State in Detroit but I’m please to see that you are still hale, hearty and devoted to the cause! Rector Smithfield, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Chet Scheel says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID June 8, 2013 at 4:17 pm Blessings on your birthday, Mal. I treasure our relationship over the years which began back in our Cathedral Films days. The importance of your work never fades. – Jon Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA January 10, 2015 at 2:20 pm Hello! I’m another voice from your past, in Fort Collins. I’d love to know how to get in touch with the documentary about your life: Disturber of the Peace. As the right-to-marry for gays became a reality in Colorado, we thought about you, and so many others we know, with joy! And then, last night, we went to see the film “Selma”, and I thought about you again and your going “down South” for Freedom Marches in the summer; must have been 1959-60. That was back in my early college experience; you opened my eyes to “important things to think about in Real Life”, and this has remained with me always. Wishing you well and continuing health, peace (at least in our personal lives), and so on………Marian and Paul Robert L Campbell says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Washington, DC March 1, 2015 at 9:57 pm Rest in peace Malcolm. What a wonderful life! Norm Morford says: hubert locke says: Rector Collierville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA June 7, 2013 at 5:13 pm Thank you Malcolm Boyd for giving me a voice to follow during my college years in the 60’s. you were and still are an inspiration as I continue to grow in my faith. I just recently used some of your writing with my EFM reunion group and others in Stephen’s Ministry. Thank you for you guidance and inclusivity in your writing. Thank you and Happy Birthday!Sue Youth Minister Lorton, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska center_img Sue Dauer says: Submit an Event Listing June 7, 2013 at 4:44 pm He and Daniel Berrigan were both also heroes of mine and I met both of them in New York in the 60s when we were all much younger. Another visionary from that time was (Sister) Corita Kent, whom I also met in New York in the 60s. I still have some of her incredible prints on my apartment walls. That was a very different time, and I was fortunate to be there and caught up in much of the excitement and passion people like them engendered. [The Episcopal News, Diocese of Los Angeles] These days, the Rev. Canon Malcolm Boyd prefers quiet revolutions to the public upheavals that have distinguished his life and times for decades.The Hollywood executive turned Episcopal priest, Freedom Rider, anti-war and gay rights activist, author, playwright, social critic and church revivalist will be 90 on June 8 and has been busy being filmed for a documentary about his life.“This is the first time anyone has made a film of my life,” he chuckled during a recent telephone interview from his Los Angeles-area home, adding: “I just show up and I’m filmed.”On April 27, Los Angeles filmmaker Andrew Thomas was on hand to document the Lambda Literary Foundation’s 25th annual benefit event OUTWRITE! honoring Boyd and other celebrated West Hollywood LGBT literary pioneers.Malcolm Boyd, photographed for an interview after the 1965 publication of Are You Running With Me, Jesus? a book of unconventional but deeply devout prayers that made Boyd an international celebrity.Perhaps best known for Are You Running with Me, Jesus? “a little book of prayers” he wrote in 1965, Boyd still is working, both as writer-in-residence of the Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles and as a regular columnist for the Huffington Post, exploring issues of life, death and aging gracefully, with his characteristic sense of humor.Like a recent column about attempts to renew his driver’s license that ultimately yielded the desired result.“Let’s just say I’m legal now,” he laughed.Despite his advanced age, “Retirement wasn’t a reality, obviously. It’s kind of a process,” Boyd said. So is reflection, and the documentary undertaking by the award-winning Thomas has offered ample opportunity for that.“Malcolm and Mark (Thompson, an author and Boyd’s partner of 30 years) and I went to Grace Cathedral and walked the labyrinth. He spoke at some events,” Thomas said during a recent telephone interview. “We’ve done four interviews with Malcolm so far; we just sit in a room quietly and we don’t deal with questions; we deal with themes and see where it takes us.“Malcolm has forgotten more than I’ll ever learn,” added Thomas, who hopes to complete the film in time for a fall release. Thomas has written, produced and/or directed highly acclaimed episodes of such TV series as “COPS” and “Modern Marvels.” He has received several Emmy award nominations for work on the History Channel, A&E, Discovery and the Sci-Fi Channel. His 2009 film “The Anatomy of Vince Guaraldi” about the jazz great has accumulated five film festival Best Documentary awards.Ironically, it was that film which led him to Boyd, he said.“Guaraldi composed ‘Cast Your Fate to the Wind’ and the music for ‘Peanuts’ and I realized that Malcolm worked with Vince twice in his life,” Thomas recalled. “[Vince] composed all the music for the very first jazz mass at Grace Cathedral and Malcolm did the sermon and then a month later, Malcolm did a series of performances at the hungry i [a café in San Francisco],” he recalled.After some initial checking, Thomas discovered Boyd was alive and well and “living about two miles from me,” the filmmaker recalled. “It was a wonderful, serendipitous moment to know that one of your heroes is still alive.”Even more serendipitous has been his discovery of historical “reel to reel” film footage of Boyd and other unpublished materials, along with interviews of people from seminal moments in Boyd’s life.Like a conversation with Penny Liuzzo, daughter of Detroit homemaker Viola Liuzzo, who was part of a group that met weekly at Boyd’s apartment during his Wayne State University chaplaincy days. Viola Liuzzo was so inspired by Boyd’s civil rights activism she left home and family to work for voter rights. She was murdered on March 25, 1965, the last night of the Selma, Alabama, voting rights march.And like Woody King Jr., “the great actor who worked with Malcolm on ‘A Study in Color’ and ‘Boy’ and a lot of those somewhat subversive plays Malcolm did about racism back in the early 1960s,” Thomas said.“[King] said Malcolm would never bring up religion or Christianity … but after working with him for a few weeks, they all realized they were inspired to go back to the word.“[Malcolm] inspires people to go on their own journey,” Thomas said. “It reminded me of the time we were taking a walk and Malcolm said, ‘the point here is not to spend your life looking for God but to allow God to find you.’ It’s typical of his way of twisting the traditional mundane approach to life and trying on a different hat and looking at it from a new perspective.“It’s part of his incredible deep well of empathy. That’s just who Malcolm is.”‘Trailblazer, truth-teller, courageous witness,’ reluctant heroBoyd was born in Buffalo, New York on June 8, 1923 to fashion model Beatrice Lowrie and financier Melville Boyd, “an alcoholic and womanizer. I later understood him and conducted his burial service. His father was an Episcopal priest, but he died so young,” Boyd said.After his parents divorced in the 1930s, Boyd and his mother moved to Colorado. He survived bouts of atheism during his undergraduate college years, and made his way to Hollywood where he worked as a junior producer before entering seminary in 1951.He was ordained to the priesthood in 1955 and after extended studies, became Colorado State University chaplain four years later. There he was dubbed the “espresso priest” for his talks given in coffee houses and bars.He has written more than 30 books and is considered an icon for righteous social struggle and a hero to many, including author Nora Gallagher and gay rights activist the Rev. Susan Russell.“There are so many things I could say about Malcolm Boyd as a trailblazer, truth-teller, and courageous witness to the power of God’s inclusive love,” said Russell, a blogger, Huffington Post contributor and senior associate at All Saints Church in Pasadena.“It is no exaggeration to say that his Are You Running With Me, Jesus? fed the hunger of a generation of people who had given up on the church or anyone connected with it having anything relevant to say. His willingness to put his faith into action by marching in Selma to end segregation was a powerful witness to what former Presiding Bishop John Hines called ‘justice as the corporate face of God’s love,’” Russell said via e-mail.“And his example as an out-gay priest in a time when such a thing was practically unimaginable was – and continues to be – an inspiration to all who work for the full inclusion of LGBT people in this church and in this country,” added Russell, a gay rights activist.Gallagher, a parishioner at Trinity Episcopal Church in Santa Barbara and author of “Moonlight Sonata at the Mayo Clinic” (Alfred P. Knopf, 2013) said in the foreword of a reprinted version of Running that Boyd’s famous book of prayers “made it possible for me to imagine a church that had something to do with what was happening in the world, to see that the work of the faithful is to expose injustice.”Yet, Boyd is reluctant to take credit for being an icon for social justice for many, or even a hero to some.He does acknowledge sacrificing personal privacy for public persona, for “belonging to the church” even as early on as 1951, when he dissolved his partnership with Hollywood stars Mary Pickford and Buddy Rogers to enter the Church Divinity School of the Pacific in Berkeley, California.In the 1940s, Malcolm Boyd was a business partner of film star Mary Pickford before he departed the Hollywood scene in 1951 to attend Church Divinity School of the Pacific.Again, with characteristic humor, he quipped that at his going-away party “with a lot of celebrities, gossip columnist Hedda Hopper said that everyone, including the bartender, bowed their heads for the Lord’s Prayer.”But “it was all new ground,” he said recalling tumultuous decades of his life. “I had no textbook. What happened came out of a very strong sense of responsibility because I realized that I was speaking for a number of other people who did not have a voice.”It meant frequently running afoul of authorities, both church and civic. While Boyd was serving as Colorado State University chaplain, students flocked to his coffeehouse campus ministry but “the bishop, without coming to look at the work, characterized it as “beatnik” and said, “you can’t call yourself a beloved child of God if you have matted hair, smell badly or wear black underwear.”“To me, this was blasphemy,” Boyd recalled.“I thought, if this was the church, then to hell with the church because it wasn’t the church of Jesus Christ. And if it wasn’t the church of Jesus Christ, then let me get out where I could breathe fresh air. Then, I answered him, that yes, you can call yourself a beloved child of God if you have matted hair, smell badly or wear black underwear.”He moved on, invited by then-bishop of Michigan Richard Emrich to serve as Wayne State University chaplain in Detroit. His activism in full swing, he demonstrated with the likes of Martin Luther King Jr. and Stokely Carmichael and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee as well as Jonathan Daniels, an Episcopal seminarian who was murdered in Selma, Alabama in August 1965 by white supremacists.“I was involved in an enveloping process,” Boyd said.“The summer of ’65 was the hardest,” he said, recalling his own harrowing close calls with white supremacists and feelings of alienation and fear.In 1977, he came out as gay. “At this point, you could throw your hands up and scream, because what do you do with a story like this?” he said, laughing. “Here’s Malcolm Boyd, with all of this — terribly controversial — and now on top of everything, he’s a queer?”Malcolm Boyd and author Mark Thompson have been a couple for 30 years. Photo/Mary GlasspoolBack in Los Angeles, he served local parishes, continued writing and public speaking engagements and met author and photographer Mark Thompson, his life partner of 30 years.He now considers himself an elder and his life “an odd story, to put it mildly. It was quite a lot to live through, so I’m grateful to anybody who helped — and a number of people did.”Aging and the prospect of turning 90 brings yet new “surprises. It’s like being on the Titanic. You’re out there on the ocean and somebody spots an iceberg. It ain’t going away.”He added that: “Wouldn’t it be great if all of us — you and I, for instance — might take ourselves a wee bit less seriously?All kidding aside, he still accepts occasional preaching and speaking engagements and is spiritual director to about a dozen people. Always the activist, he adds: “I accept myself as an elder. I think elders need to analyze their own position in society and in some cases argue with society about what their position is because I think there’s all sorts of stereotypes about elderly people right now.”Perhaps his own experiences could still serve as a primer for the church: “There’s too much talk about the future of the church and meetings and discussions,” he said. “If you have faith, the main thing now is to move, one foot ahead of another, and to trust in God.”As always, Boyd looks to the future with hope, adding: “Let’s do this again in 10 years.” Submit a Press Release June 7, 2013 at 4:57 pm I worked with Malcolm in the Santa Monica parish for a decade. In addition to everything said about him in the above sketch, I can attest to his being a loyal friend, a , a great preacher, a peacemaker, and a gifted teacher. One Lent he led an adult group in a study based on his book, “Take Off the Masks.” Each member made a mask to wear. In sessions that proved to be transformative, members shared the “masks” they had worn in life and were brave enough to begin taking off. Malcolm Boyd is a national treasure. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books July 16, 2013 at 1:47 am I am 83 and was a parishioner at St. Augustine-by-the-Sea Episcopal Church (St. As) in Santa Monica when Malcolm Boyd and Fred Fenton were both there. I want to testify to the social climate that Malcolm had to overcome. I grew up in the 1930s and ’40s in the Midwest (Indianapolis) where it was assumed that homosexuality was a rare but very grave sin. I received an A.B. frm Harvard in the early 1950s where I was taught that homosexuality was an illness and a sign of immaturity. I met my first self-avowed homosexual in my senior year at Harvard, and he was a French student, not an American. I didn’t meet any openly homosexual prople in the U.S. Air Force in which I served in the mid 1950s during which time I witnessed the dishonorable discharge for homosexuality of a master sargent just 2 months before he was eligible to retire with full benefits. I made my first homosexual friend while living in Palo Alto in the very late 50s where my children were introduced to homosexuality without the negative assumptions I was reared on. I witnessed the alienation of some of my fellow parishioners at St. A’s when Malcolm, an openly “gay” man living with another openly “gay” man, came there as a priest.It was very difficult, very dangerous– and so very courageous, to come out as a homosexual in those days. But it was very important to the growing acceptance of homosexuality as a “normal”, acceptable expression of sexuality because it broke down the demonization of homosexuality. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group June 7, 2013 at 9:58 am As a college student in the late 60″s and a Roman Catholic, Malcolm Boyd and Dan Berrigan, were two of my favorite writers and inspirations. I was thrilled to actually meet Malcolm, get him to autograph several of his books, and with several others, have dinner with him at a conference LA a few years ago. As I age, not sure as gracefully, he continues to inspire me. Thanks for a great article about a truly great man. Rector Belleville, IL December 29, 2013 at 12:25 am i met Malcolm Boyd in the early 1970s when he was staying at Mishkanot ha Shananim the official guest house of the City of Jerusalem. At that time, my late husband, Wallace Hirsch, was working for the JJerusalem Foundation, under the inspirational leadership of Mayor Teddy Kollek. AS Wally was a recent immigrant from the US, personable and knowledgable, he was included in activities for new English-speaking guests at Mishkanot. And there Wally and Malcolm met. For weeks thereafter they explored the city, met many local people from various backgrounds, and talked and talked and talked. Malcolm joined us at our weekly Friday night Sabbath dinner in our small apartment, with its pi’not ohel (tiny dining nook). Our daughters, then 12 and 7, helped serving the meal — usually a vegetable soup, grilled chicken, rice and an American-style salad. Dinner ended with my ‘famous chocolate brownies. We were sorry to see Malcolm leave at the end of his visit, hoping he left taking some of Jerusalem’s magic with him. Sadly Wally died not long after Malcolm left. I am hoping that Malcolm still remembers us — and particularly my dear Wally, who loved sharing ‘his’ Jerusalem with visitors to our city and found a ‘soulmate’ in Malcolm Boyd. People John McHugh-Dennis says: Marian Febvre says: The Rev. Fred Fenton says: June 7, 2013 at 9:02 pm My path crossed with Father Boyd during the upheavals at the end of 60s in New Haven. I met him at a time when my life was changing and he was a brave man and influence. I’m so glad that life has been good to him. A lot of his advice helped me through fearsome times or a middle class woman who had never been brought up to be alone. Peace and God Bless, Father. Rector Albany, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Roger Bowen says: Tags Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Susan Robinson says: Press Release Service In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 June 8, 2013 at 5:54 pm In the late 60’s while struggling with my faith, a friend suggested I read “Are You Running With Me Jesus”. I consider that work a life changing moment. Joined ECUSA after marriage in ’71 and have been active in Parish life ever since. Am a political conservative but social liberal (an enigma – Yeah, I know). Anyway, I cherish Fr. Boyd as one of the three writers most influential in my faith journey. He being who first taught me how easy it is to be in relationship with the Lord.Bless you, Malcolm. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Jon Paul Davidson says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group June 7, 2013 at 4:14 pm Thanksgiving for Malcolm’s life!All blessings,jim Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Shreveport, LA JIm Toy says: Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Isaac T. Graves says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 last_img read more

Church sends memo to US President, Congress on South Sudan…

first_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Tampa, FL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Smithfield, NC Press Release Service Featured Events Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit an Event Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books [Episcopal News Service] A Jan. 10 memo to the Obama Administration and members of U.S. Congress sent by the Episcopal Church’s Washington, D.C.-based Office of Government Relations outlines the current crisis in South Sudan and makes recommendations urging the government and the international community to partner with South Sudanese civic and faith leaders to stem the tide of violence and build peace.The six-page memo, based on the firsthand accounts of church leaders on the ground in South Sudan and Episcopal and Anglican partners worldwide, conveys the church’s understanding of the current crisis that has engulfed the world’s newest nation. The memo touches on four areas specifically: public representation of the conflict and accountability; foreign assistance; human rights protection and the prevention of mass atrocities; and building a future of peace.“Episcopalians in the United States and around the world have maintained long and close relationships with Episcopalians in South Sudan,” said Alexander Baumgarten, director of government relations for the Episcopal Church.   “As a result, we have a responsibility to share the unique and compelling perspectives of partners in South Sudan who are playing a peacemaking role in the midst of extraordinary upheaval and violence.”Among other things, the memo warns “While ethnic tensions are real and reflect the fruits of decades of upheaval and struggle, they are not the primary driving engine for the current violence,” and stresses that the media’s, and to an extent, the U.S. government’s portrayal of the violence as between ethnic and tribal groups is “misleading,” “simplistic,” and “could carry dire consequences.”It also warns that the east African nation could be on the brink of civil war, and that the U.S. and others bear the responsibility of preventing mass atrocities and human rights violations.  Click here to read the full memo to the president and Congress.The estimated death toll had reached 10,000 people by Jan. 9. Some 200,000 people have been internally displaced inside South Sudan and tens of thousands of refugees have crossed borders into neighboring countries.Fighting erupted in Juba, the nation’s capital, on Dec. 15 following a political dispute between President Salva Kiir and his former deputy, Riek Machar. In the weeks since, the crisis has spread to seven states and has created a humanitarian crisis in the fledgling nation.“Our most-current reports indicate that violence is still spreading and that the urgent needs for food, medicine, and shelter could continue for months to come.   The situation mirrors the dire time before Sudan’s 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement, in which interminable civil war killed millions and uprooted millions more from their homes,” the memo’s introduction states.Baumgarten noted that Episcopalians and Anglicans around the world with mission ties to Sudan and South Sudan have been hosting regular conference calls in the weeks since violence erupted in mid-December, and that his office’s staff have been sharing vital information as they learn it with U.S. government officials coordinating the humanitarian and peacemaking response.“This is an example of an area in which the advocacy of Episcopalians can make a vital difference,” said Baumgarten.  “There is no civic institution in South Sudan with a larger footprint than the church, and our experience is that government officials in the United States and elsewhere are quite eager to hear perspectives from church partners on the ground.The Episcopal Church of South Sudan and Sudan, with 2 million members, has 31 dioceses — 26 of them in South Sudan where it is one of the nation’s largest non-government organizations and has played a role in reconciliation in the aftermath of a two-decades-long civil war fought largely between the Arab and Muslim north and rebels in the Christian-animist south, that left 2 million people dead and an estimated 7 million displaced. South Sudan gained its independence from the north on July 9, 2011.Sudan’s warring parties signed the 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement, ending the civil war that killed more than 2 million people and displaced an estimated 7 million more. South Sudan officially gained its independence from Sudan on July 9, 2011.The memo points out that, “The leaders of the new state did not vigorously undertake the task of addressing the challenges of developing a unified nation and healing past divisions.” And that unification and healing are central to peacemaking efforts.(In May 2013, South Sudan’s president appointed Archbishop Daniel Deng Bul to chair the national reconciliation committee, which planned a four-to five-year national campaign aimed and fostering peace building and reconciliation.)The memo praises the Obama administration for its Dec. 3 pledge of an additional $50 million in humanitarian aid, but urges an “examination” of its and Congress’s aid strategy. On Jan. 9, news reports suggested that South Sudan risks losing hundreds of millions of dollars in U.S. aid if government and rebel forces do not end the violence.Meanwhile, Episcopalians and Anglicans across the Anglican Communion, including Episcopal Relief & Development, and Primate’s World Relief and Development Fund, working with local partners in South Sudan, have begun responding to the crisis.“The Episcopal Church, along with Episcopal and Anglican partners around the world, has mounted its own response of financial support, material accompaniment, and prayer for the people of South Sudan. We believe strongly that the Episcopal Church of South Sudan and Sudan and other faith groups there are among the most fruitful potential actors in leading and facilitating peace, humanitarian assistance, and healing,” the memo states.The Episcopal Church’s long-standing support for Sudan is manifested through its partnerships and companion diocese relationships, programs supported by Episcopal Relief & Development, and the advocacy work of the Office of Government Relations, which is rooted in General Convention resolutions.Two Episcopal Church missionaries who were serving in South Sudan, Ed Eastman and Noah Hillerbrand, both engaged in food-security work, were evacuated from Renk to Nairobi, Kenya, on Dec. 20.– Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service.  Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Bath, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Church sends memo to US President, Congress on South Sudan crisis Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Albany, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Job Listing By Lynette WilsonPosted Jan 13, 2014 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Sudan & South Sudan Rector Collierville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Martinsville, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Faith & Politics, Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Washington, DC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Tagslast_img read more

Rapidísimas

first_img The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Por Onell A. SotoPosted Sep 11, 2014 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Events The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Albany, NY Submit a Press Release Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Shreveport, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Los obispos venezolanos han rechazado la parodia del Padrenuestro dirigido al difunto presidente Hugo Chávez y que se dio a la publicidad recientemente. La oración invoca a Chávez y pide que sus ideales revolucionarios se cumplan en la tierra. Fue preparada durante  el Diseño del Sistema de Formación Socialista. Los obispos han dicho que esta parodia da pie a la idolatría algo contrario a la fe cristiana.El 105º arzobispo de Canterbury y primado de Inglaterra, Justin Welby, está realizando una  visita pastoral por Brasil y Chile. En Sao Paulo fue recibido por el primado de Brasil Francisco de Assis da Silva y un grupo de clérigos y fieles. Le acompaña su esposa Caroline. En  un encuentro con líderes de otras iglesias y dirigentes locales habló de “El rol de la fe en el progreso de la sociedad”. En Chile puso la primera piedra del Centro Comunitario de Batuco, una comunidad del Gran Santiago, y encabezó una ceremonia litúrgica de Acción de Gracias para recordar al capitán Allan Gardiner, pionero y mártir de la misión anglicana que falleció el 6 de septiembre de 1851 en la Patagonia.Thomas Cranmer (1489-1556) considerado el principal arquitecto de la liturgia anglicana y líder de la Reforma Inglesa como arzobispo de Cantórbery, muchos cambios que han influenciado a la iglesia hasta el día de hoy. Él reformó la Eucaristía, el celibato sacerdotal, el papel de las imágenes en las iglesias y la veneración de los santos. Murió en la hoguera en 1556. En resumen se puede decir que Cranmer: Unificó todos los libros de oficios de la iglesia en su solo volumen: el Libro de Oración Común, puso el culto en la lengua del pueblo,  purificó el culto inglés purgándolo de todo error y de todo cuanto no fuera escriturario e hizo del culto celebraciones sencillas donde el pueblo podía participar de manera activa.Dos sacerdotes episcopales con profundas raíces personales en dos de los países que están siendo devastados por el ébola dicen que los empeños por contener la propagación del virus mortal están siendo obstaculizados por la lentitud de la respuesta, la falta de suministros médicos, el analfabetismo, la pobreza y la desinformación. “El problema que hemos tenido es que los liberianos no toman medidas preventivas”, dijo James Tetegba Yarsiah al Servicio Episcopal de Prensa. Liberia junto con Sierra Leona y Guinea se encuentran en el centro del peor brote de ébola de la historia. Poco a poco los residentes de estos países están despertando a la realidad de este mortal virus.Después de 22 años de guerras y luchas internas nació en el 2012 la nación de Sudán del Sur. El obispo anglicano Moses Deng Bal de  la diócesis de Wau ha dicho que la mejor manera de honrar a los mártires de la guerra es vivir en “amor y unidad” debido a que todavía hay zonas donde abunda la violencia. El obispo añadió que la única manera de vivir en paz y tranquilidad es “perdonándonos los unos a los otros”.El semanario británico The Economist informa que Cuba ha recibido más de 700 millones de dólares de Brasil en un año como pago por los servicios prestados por los miles de médicos que sirven en el país suramericano. Grupos opositores al régimen de La Habana han dicho que Cuba explota a esos profesionales y por eso muchos han desertado de los centros médicos. Es una verdadera “trata de blancos” la llamada misión médica, dicen médicos que han podido escaparse. El número total de profesionales de la medicina desde que se inició el programa asciende a 440,000, dice la revista.La situación de Cuba se agrava por día. La prensa ha informado que 17 balseros que salieron de Cuba por Manzanillo en la antigua provincia de Oriente, perecieron en su travesía ahogados frente a las costas de Yucatán, México. La marina mexicana logró rescatar 17 otras personas que probablemente serán deportados a Cuba.El ex presidente de Israel, Simón Péres, ha propuesto al papa Francisco la formación de una “ONU de religiones” ante la ineficiencia de la actual organización internacional. Péres  dijo que cada rato estallan guerras  con la excusa de la religión.  “Hay miles de movimientos terroristas que pretenden matar en nombre de la religión”, dijo Péres.Los abusos contra las mujeres y los niños son noticias frecuentes en la prensa mundial. El Oriente Medio parece ser el principal lugar donde las mujeres no gozan de ningún derecho y son maltratadas y hasta asesinadas. Hay varias organizaciones luchando contra este flagelo pero hasta ahora todo se ha quedado en “letra muerta”.MANDAMIENTO: Ama a tu prójimo como a ti mismo. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Knoxville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Job Listing Rapidísimas Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Bath, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Tampa, FL Submit an Event Listing Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Press Release Service Curate Diocese of Nebraska Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Hopkinsville, KY last_img read more

El Día Mundial del SIDA 2016

first_img Submit a Press Release Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Course Director Jerusalem, Israel [1 de diciembre del 2016] El Revdmo. Michael B. Curry, Obispo Presidente y Primado de la Iglesia Episcopal, y la Revda. Elizabeth A. Eaton, Obispa Presidente de la Iglesia Evangélica Luterana en América (ELCA), han emitido la siguiente declaración conjunta sobre el Día Mundial del SIDA 2016.Declaración del Día Mundial del SIDA1 de diciembre:A medida que nos preparamos para celebrar el nacimiento de Jesús, se nos recuerda la promesa de vida que nos fue dada incondicionalmente. Las Escrituras nos enseñan que el don de Dios de la vida se extiende a todos nosotros, sin importar nuestras circunstancias. En palabras del Apóstol Pablo: “No nos cansemos de hacer el bien, que a su debido tiempo cosecharemos sin fatiga, si no nos damos por vencidos. Por tanto, mientras tengamos ocasión, hagamos el bien a todos…” (Gálatas 6: 9-10).Durante muchos años, luteranos, episcopales y otras comunidades de fe se han dedicado a proporcionar atención, tratamiento, servicios de prevención y han apoyado las iniciativas que combaten el estigma y la discriminación hacia los que viven con el VIH. Lamentamos los 35 millones de vidas perdidas por el SIDA y, con 36.7 millones de personas que aún viven con el VIH en todo el mundo, nuestras iglesias, nuestros gobiernos y todos los demás socios necesitan hacer más. Animamos a luteranos y a episcopales que están por todo el mundo a solidarizarse con todas las personas que viven con el VIH y a continuar la difícil tarea de construir una generación libre del SIDA. De nuevo nos comprometemos a un futuro libre de esta pandemia.Un reto de esta magnitud necesita todos nuestros esfuerzos. El acceso desigual a los medicamentos que salvan vidas, la dieta saludable y otros determinantes vitales para romper el control de esta epidemia, siguen afectando desproporcionadamente a las personas de color. Una parte importante de este trabajo es asegurar que los medicamentos antirretrovirales estén disponibles para todos los que los necesiten. Actualmente, menos de la mitad de las personas afectadas por el VIH tienen acceso a estos medicamentos que salvan vidas. Los estudios han demostrado que cuando una persona que es VIH + toma medicamentos antirretrovirales continua y correctamente, su carga viral puede ser suprimida hasta el punto de que ya no sea infecciosa. En otras palabras, el tratamiento es prevención. Y así, debemos ampliar nuestros esfuerzos en esta área.Como personas de fe se nos pide que activamente eliminemos el estigma y la discriminación dentro de nuestras propias comunidades de fe y especialmente lo que afecte a las poblaciones marginadas vulnerables y claves  (lesbianas, gays, bisexuales, transgéneros e intersexuales, trabajadores sexuales, personas que se inyectan drogas, migrantes, mujeres y niñas). Debemos ser firmes en nuestra defensa de la dignidad y los derechos humanos de todas las personas que viven con el VIH.Como parte de los objetivos de desarrollo sostenible que las Naciones Unidas adoptaron en septiembre del 2015, la comunidad internacional se ha comprometido a poner fin a la epidemia del SIDA para el año 2030. Ulteriores compromisos se hicieron en junio de este año cuando 192 países reunidos en las Naciones Unidas declararon que acelerarían y ampliarían las respuestas al VIH y al SIDA para alcanzar el objetivo de poner fin a la epidemia en el 2030. Un camino crítico para alcanzar este objetivo es la estrategia 90-90-90, que pretende asegurar que para el año 2020, el 90% las personas que viven con el VIH recibirán un diagnóstico, el 90% de las personas que viven con el VIH recibirán medicamentos antirretrovirales y el 90% de los que reciben tratamiento antirretroviral tendrán su carga viral suprimida.La falta de financiación para los programas del VIH y  del SIDA sigue siendo un reto. El objetivo de poner fin a la epidemia del SIDA antes del 2030 no se alcanzará si los países donantes no logran abordar esta brecha de financiación. Hacemos un llamamiento al Presidente electo Donald Trump para que haga un compromiso público con la lucha mundial contra el VIH. Instamos a la nueva Administración y al Congreso a aumentar los fondos para PEPFAR; el Fondo Mundial de lucha contra el SIDA, la tuberculosis y la malaria; y programas nacionales que proporcionan servicios preventivos y de tratamiento en Estados Unidos.El Revdmo. Michael B. CurryObispo Presidente y PrimadoIglesia EpiscopalLa Revda. Elizabeth A. EatonObispa PresidenteIglesia Evangélica Luterana en América Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Tags Press Release Service Rector Belleville, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Health & Healthcare, TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Smithfield, NC Posted Dec 1, 2016 Curate Diocese of Nebraska This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Collierville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York center_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Events Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Tampa, FL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET HIV/AIDS Featured Jobs & Calls El Día Mundial del SIDA 2016 El Obispo Presidente de la Iglesia Episcopal, Curry, La Obispa Presidente de ELCA, Eaton, emiten una declaración conjunta Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA last_img read more

Georgia lynching victims remembered as racial reconciliation efforts expand

first_img Kay Bell says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Racial Justice & Reconciliation Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest April 11, 2017 at 7:48 pm Please also read “Blood at the Root” by Patrick Phillips as you work for racial reconciliation in Georgia. Though I don’t live there now, I have a long family history from Forsyth County. But this is a story that was never told within the family or community to our great shame. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET By David PaulsenPosted Apr 11, 2017 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Jobs & Calls Press Release Service Rector Belleville, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Georgia lynching victims remembered as racial reconciliation efforts expand New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Press Release Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Advocacy Peace & Justice, center_img Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Comments are closed. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Hopkinsville, KY April 11, 2017 at 4:44 pm “The Cross and the Lynching Tree,” by James H. Cone, was the focus of our 2017 Lenten Book Reading at New Song Episcopal in Coralville, Iowa. The book was painful to read, but well worth it, for it gave us all (about 15 participants) a chance to empathize with the terror that African Americans felt. It also helped us to understand why many African Americans are reticent, even today, to participate in the healing process. Nevertheless, we must all continue to persist. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Washington, DC Featured Events Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Jim Conger says: Rector Albany, NY A historical marker remembering lynching victims in Georgia is unveiled on March 18 in LaGrange. Photo courtesy of Wesley Edwards[Episcopal News Service] In one of the darkest corners of American history – the lynching of black victims by white attackers – details of many of these decades-old killings have long remained a mystery as present-day researchers seek to identify the victims and bring racial healing to their communities.Those efforts have gained steam in Georgia, where last year the Episcopal Diocese of Atlanta launched a three-year series of pilgrimages intended to bring these victims and their stories to light. At the same time, a group of residents in one west-central Georgia community, LaGrange, has been working with police, civic leaders and churches to come to grips with a nearly forgotten lynching in their city.“The wind of the spirit is blowing … and moving us to the realization that in order [for] racial healing to occur then we have to deal with lynching,” said Catherine Meeks, who heads the Diocese of Atlanta’s Beloved Community: Commission for Dismantling Racism.Meeks praises the work of the LaGrange group, named Troup Together, after Troup County, where the town is located. The diocese and Troup Together are pursuing separate but parallel efforts with similar goals: to remember lynching victims, reveal their untold stories and encourage racial reconciliation.Nearly two years of work by Troup Together culminated in January in a public apology issued by Police Chief Lou Dekmar for his department’s role in the lynching of Austin Callaway in 1940. Callaway was found gravely injured on the side of a highway after being taken from a cell at the LaGrange jail by a white mob, an injustice enabled by LaGrange officers.And in March, white pastors spoke at a church service to confess white congregations’ complicity in Callaway’s death and other acts of racial violence. That service was followed by a dedication of a historical marker at Warren Temple United Methodist Church and a cemetery service for Callaway and more than 500 lynching victims in Troup County and around the state.St. Mark’s Episcopal Church is among several LaGrange congregations working with Troup Together. The church hosted a luncheon for Callaway’s relatives and those of two other lynching victims before they attended the church service in March.“While we can’t change [the past], we can acknowledge the horror of it and regret it and make our atonement,” said Janet Beall, a retired educator and longtime member of St. Mark’s who attended the ceremonies along with St. Mark’s rector, the Very Rev. R. Allen Pruitt.Troup Together evolved from a biracial faith community in LaGrange called Alterna that two years ago read and discussed “The Cross and the Lynching Tree,” a 2011 book by James H. Cone. The group’s subsequent research into local history turned up information on the lynching of Callaway. That led to a prayer service in September 2015 marking 75 years since the killing. The reconciliation efforts have grown from there.“Our goal is to learn to love our neighbors, and I find that we really can’t do that in any meaningful way unless we know each other’s stories,” said Wesley Edwards, one of the leaders of Troup Together. “Even though we live in the same community we don’t share the same histories as racial groups, and there’s a lot that we don’t know or appreciate across the boundaries of race about each other.”Cone’s book draws a direct parallel between Jesus’ death on the cross and the deep suffering of American blacks that continued after slavery into what he identifies as “the lynching era,” 1880 to 1940.“In that era, the lynching tree joined the cross as the most emotionally charged symbols in the African American community,” Cone says. “Both the cross and the lynching tree represented the worst in human beings and at the same time ‘an unquenchable ontological thirst’ for life that refuses to let the worst determine our final meaning.”In segregated communities across the South, the intended message of a lynching was fear, Meeks said.“The purpose of it was to terrorize black people and any white people who were going to sympathize with black people, so lynching was about terror,” Meeks said. Its roots were in a thread of American society that held a belief in white supremacy, she said, “and that same white supremacy thread continues to haunt us in this country.”The Commission on Dismantling Racism, whose anti-racism training program has served as a model for other Episcopal dioceses, is working to honor the 600 or so people documented to have died from lynching in Georgia. Its first pilgrimage, in October, brought nearly 200 people to Macon, Georgia, and the site where in 1922 a lynch mob dumped the body of John “Cockey” Glover.The commission has a busy 2017 planned. A second pilgrimage is set for Athens this October, Meeks said, and her commission is working to open a center for racial healing near Morehouse College in Atlanta by that month. The commission also is encouraging parishes in the diocese to hold screenings of the movie “13th,” about racial injustice in the American prison system.Meeks and her team also want to establish a permanent memorial to Georgia’s lynching victims that incorporates the list of names, similar to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. Meeks is in contact with the Center for Civil and Human Rights in Atlanta as one possible location.“There is great interest in this idea,” Meeks said, estimating a two-year timeframe for the project to come together.There are plenty of victims to remember, including some whose precise fate remains unknown.Bobbie Hart, one of the Troup Together leaders, never knew her paternal grandfather. He vanished decades ago while working on the railroad, and the more Hart and her sister learned about him and his mysterious disappearance the more they became convinced that he had been the victim of a lynching.Hart, who was raised Baptist and now attends a Methodist church, knows relatives of Austin Callaway but was unaware of the lynching until working on Troup Together with Edwards. She was overcome with emotion while attending the group’s prayer service for Callaway in 2015.“I felt a sadness come over me and I prayed and I felt the need to ask the Lord to forgive the men that did this to them,” Hart, now 64, said. “And I felt that it was important that, me being a black female … I chose to forgive this injustice.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Submit an Event Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Tags Comments (2) Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Job Listinglast_img read more