Jamaica begins preparations

first_imgJamaica will start a training camp in preparation for a historic appearance at the Caribbean Football Union (CFU) Futsal Championship to be held in Havana, Cuba, January 22-26.A 16-man squad was named by player/coach Theodore ‘Tappa’ Whitmore to start training today at the National Indoors Sports Centre.A total of eight teams, divided into two groups, will participate in the CFU tournament.Group One comprises: Trinidad and Tobago, Antigua and Barbuda, CuraÁao and Guyana, while Group Two features host Cuba, Guadeloupe, Jamaica and St Maarten.Jamaica is scheduled to face Guadeloupe on January 22 in the opening game at the Sala Polivalente Kid Chocolate Complex in Cuba.The top three from the CFU will advance to the CONCACAF Championship on May 8-15 in Costa Rica. After that, the top four will advance to the 2016 World Futsal Championship.The training squad is: Anthony Marks, Savian Maxwell, Loran Lewis, Jason Wint, Theodore Whitmore, Fabian Taylor, Edsel Scott, Ramone Sibley, Jerome Haughton, David Swaby, Marcelino Blackburn, Shavar Blake, Marvin Morgan, Michily Waul, Donovan Carey and Kemeel Wolfe.last_img read more

Smoking can trigger severe pain in legs

first_imgResearchers have found a strong link between smoking and peripheral artery disease – a circulatory condition in which narrowed blood vessels reduce blood flow to the limbs – and this elevated risk can persist up to 30 years after quitting smoking. A recently published study also found that the link between smoking and peripheral artery disease was even stronger than that for coronary heart disease and stroke. “The study suggests that campaigns about smoking’s health risks should emphasize the elevated risk of peripheral artery disease, not just coronary heart disease and stroke,” said senior study author. Also Read – An income drop can harm brainThe study found that compared with never-smokers, those who smoked for more than 40 pack-years had roughly four times more risk for peripheral artery disease, versus 2.1 times and 1.8 times more risk for coronary heart disease and stroke, respectively. A pack-year is a parameter of smoking – 10 pack-years can mean one pack per day for 10 years or two packs per day for five years or some other combination. Similarly, participants who reported currently smoking more than a pack per day had a relative increased risk – 5.4 times more for peripheral artery disease versus 2.4 for coronary heart disease and 1.9 for stroke – compared to those who had never smoked. Also Read – Shallu Jindal honoured with Mahatma AwardPeripheral artery disease features the atherosclerotic build-up of cholesterol-laden deposits in arteries serving the legs. The reduction of blood flow leads to limb pain, poor wound healing, and other signs and symptoms. The effect of smoking on peripheral artery disease risk was not just stronger; it was also longer-lasting. Only after 30 years of smoking cessation did the peripheral artery disease risk for former smokers return to the baseline level seen in never-smokers. By comparison, coronary heart disease risk took about 20 years to return to baseline after smoking cessation. The good news is that quitting smoking appeared to bring a meaningful drop in peripheral artery disease risk fairly quickly. “We observed a lower risk for peripheral artery disease, coronary heart disease, and stroke within five years of smoking cessation,” says Ning Ding, a data analyst and author of the study. “Smoking almost always starts in adolescence or early adulthood, and it’s very important that young people understand how long the elevated health risk persists even after they’ve quit,” the researchers noted.last_img read more

BC court orders insurance firm to pay for mans emergency surgery in

first_imgVICTORIA – An insurance company that refused to pay for a British Columbia man’s emergency heart surgery has been ordered by a B.C. Supreme Court judge in Victoria to cover the US$180,000 bill.Paul Fletcher took the Royal & Sun Alliance Insurance Company to court when it refused to pay, claiming an exclusion clause applied because there was medical evidence that the man might be hospitalized while travelling.Fletcher testified that his doctor told him his angina was stable and he was safe to take a trip to Mexico.He booked a return flight to Canada when he began having chest pains, but when his symptoms worsened his plane made an emergency landing in Seattle where he underwent coronary artery bypass surgery.The insurance firm’s expert physician criticized both Fletcher and his doctors at trial, saying there was a reasonable expectation that treatment or hospitalization could be required while travelling.But Justice Jacqueline Dorgan said in a ruling posted online this week that the exclusion clause does not apply and she ordered the firm pay for the emergency surgery.“The plaintiff’s evidence is that following consultations with his treating physicians, he was satisfied the trip would pose no risk to his health and that it was safe for him to travel. There is no evidence he had medical evidence or opinion to the contrary,” the judge concluded.She also ordered the insurance company cover his legal fees.last_img read more