San Diego Swift Water Rescue teams will not be deployed to Houston

first_img Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter 123 Show Caption Hide Caption Show Caption Hide Caption SAN DIEGO (KUSI) — 8:30 p.m. — San Diego’s swift water rescues teams will not be deployed to Houston to assist in the aftermath of the storm.San Diego Fire-Rescue Chief Brian Fennessy released a statement Wednesday night saying representatives from the California Office of Emergency Services (CalOES) held a conference call with fire agency chief officers representing all of the CalOES designated and available swift water rescue teams.”CalOES informed those on the conference call that they had not received, nor do they anticipate receiving an EMAC request from the State of Texas for more than two of the CalOES sponsored swift water rescue teams. The CalOES sponsored San Diego Fire-Rescue Department (SDFD) Swiftwater Rescue Team is not one of the two teams that have been identified to deploy if, in fact, CalOES receives a formal request from another state for assistance,” Chief Fennessy said.”For decades, SDFD has actively participated in local, statewide and federal mutual aid. It’s important to note that the fire chief of any department retains the authority to approve or disapprove mutual aid requests. I am prepared to honor and approve federal or state emergency mutual aid resource requests for assistance to any of the areas impacted by Hurricane/Tropical Storm Harvey.  However, it is my sworn duty to NOT honor or approve any outside agency mutual aid request for resources if doing so would cause the department to unreasonably deplete its resources, facilities, and/or services which would then represent an unacceptable risk to the residents and visitors of the City of San Diego,” Chief Fennessy added.11:00 a.m. — A San Diego Lifeguard Swift Water Rescue team — at the center of a dispute over San Diego’s emergency response to Hurricane Harvey — will likely be sent Wednesday to aid the search and rescue efforts in the wake of the storm’s devastation, officials said.Lifeguard Sgt. Ed Harris, the head of the lifeguards union in San Diego and a former interim city councilman, had accused the fire chief of blocking the team’s deployment, but the chief said Tuesday that assistance from the lifeguards had not been requested.That changed later Tuesday.President Trump visited Texas (Tuesday) afternoon, and shortly thereafter there was a call for the deployment of 100 swift water rescue teams from around the country to help with recovery efforts,” San Diego Fire-Rescue Department spokeswoman Monica Munoz said Tuesday night. “(The California Office of Emergency Services) is still waiting for the formal request but expects to order its 13 swift water rescue teams, including one based in San Diego, to head to Texas.”That team will be led by a SDFRD battalion chief and consist of two addition Fire-Rescue personnel and 11 lifeguards.In an open letter to Texas Governor Gregg Abbott and in a news conference early Tuesday, Harris accused SDFRD chief Brian Fennessy of blocking the lifeguard team’s deployment after the lifeguards packed and readied several boats as Harvey approached the Gulf Coast.”We are sickened that Chief Brian Fennessy has blocked our response,” Harris wrote in the letter also addressed to Houston’s mayor and residents. Fennessy responded with a news conference of his own at which he explained that San Diego already sent rescuers — Urban Search and Rescue California Task Force 8, which specializes in large-scale urban disasters — and deployment decisions were being made by FEMA and state emergency services offices.”There is a system that provides the resources during these types of disasters,” he said. “I can’t just send them down there because they want to go.”Harvey, now a tropical storm, first made landfall Friday over Texas. Flooding from the rain has displaced thousands, caused at least 30 confirmed or suspected deaths and dropped more rain than any previous storm in U.S. history, with more than 50 inches in some areas. It moved back over the Gulf of Mexico before making landfall again this morning in Louisiana. Show Caption Hide Caption Posted: August 29, 2017 August 29, 2017center_img Show Caption Hide Caption San Diego Swift Water Rescue teams will not be deployed to Houston to assist in storm aftermath Show Caption Hide Caption KUSI Newsroom KUSI Newsroom, San Diego Urban Search & Rescue Task Force 8 in transit just outside of San Antonio. Eager to join the rescue effort. So proud of you all! pic.twitter.com/xfZHXo4eT4— Chief Brian Fennessy (@SDFDChief) August 29, 2017Harris said in his letter that even when asked to stand down Saturday, his team remained prepared.”Our team stayed packed and readied more boats and asked to go,” Harris wrote in the letter he released Monday night. “We have plenty of staff to send, but we are blocked.”Fennessy said he was “profoundly, profoundly disappointed in lifeguard Sgt. Harris,” who he accused of lying about the response and “politicizing his own agenda.”The dispute was not the first time Harris has squared off publicly with the fire chief and the fire department. Earlier this year the lifeguard union, which is part of Teamsters Local 911, filed a grievance in opposition to the change in dispatching procedure for inland water rescues. And last month Harris filed a lawsuit against the city of San Diego accusing Fennessy of “purposefully and recklessly manipulating public-safety data and procedures in order to rationalize an expansion of the fire department’s personnel.”City officials countered that reassigning calls to the SDFRD dispatch instead of lifeguard dispatch was a necessary move because the lifeguards’ system, which only allows for two calls to be answered at a time, tended to be quickly overwhelmed, forcing some 911 calls to go unanswered during high-volume periods, such as in severe storm conditions. last_img read more

Time Inc is Really Really Excited About Tablets

first_imgMagazine publishers are jumping on the Apple iPad app bandwagon in droves and arguably for good reason. It’s a sleek, nifty device that not only has captured the attention and imagination (and dollars) of consumers but also is a vibrant new platform for distributing content.At Time Inc.—which already has launched apps for Time and Entertainment Weekly—the vibe among upper management is of sheer enthusiasm. By upper management, I’m referring specifically to CEO Ann Moore. During parent company Time Warner’s “Investor Day” Thursday, Moore updated attendees on the division’s recent performance (it reported an operating income of $50 million during the first quarter 2010, versus a loss of $32 million during the same period last year) and gushed about providing paid content through mobile and portable devices. In addition to the Time and Entertainment Weekly apps, Moore said the company is readying several more from its other magazine brands, including a People app and food, beauty and cleaning apps for Real Simple.Here’s a sampling of soundbites from Moore’s presentation and the Q+A session that followed, in no particular order:At my lunch table today, I was shocked that not one of you had an iPad.We see the next flood of new portable color touchscreens headed to market in the next 18 months as a game changer. It will be the opportunity that content producers like Time Inc have been waiting for to reestablish value for quality digital content. It’s argued that it will be impossible to get consumers to pay for digital content since they’ve grown up getting everything for free. We disagree.It’s become increasingly clear that customers will pay for trusted quality content that’s easy to access and fairly priced.The tablet restores something we lost when we went to the Web. Our readers can once again literally touch our content while still having that familiar “lean back” experience of a magazine. In real time, they can link in instead of linking out to the rest of the story on Time.com.We’ve spent decades perfecting the craft of making magazines. Now we can apply all that experience to the new virtual magazine, letting consumers feast on incredible images … as well as the stories behind them with just a little flick.The advertising can be so good it can become content itself. It can help you evaluate products. And when you’ve made your decision it can help to find you a place to buy them.As more and more hardware manufacturers come in with these e-readers there is just huge demand for our product, for our video product, for my print product—it’ll all be combined. We think very healthy business models will be coming out of it. We’ll be making more money in those businesses than we’ve been making with our traditional dot-coms.We have a great deal of work to do over next 12 to 18 months, to develop business models, evolve products and talk to consumers and advertisers.People are paying. We know people will pay for it … it’s a business model that is just really very delicious.Oh, and one other thing that came up during Time Warner’s Investor Day: the possibility of a Time Inc. sell-off. Company chairman and CEO Jeff Bewkes said (again) that it won’t happen, indicating that it is in an “attractive” position in relation to the competition and in a good growth mode for 2010. “It’s a good business, and we’re good at it,” he said.last_img read more

Butterfield Elected New CBC Chair

first_imgRep. G.K. Butterfield (D-N.C.) is the new chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus.The members of the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) recently voted a former North Carolina jurist as its leader for the 114th Congress.Rep. G.K. Butterfield (D-N.C.) was voted to lead the Congressional Black Caucus on Nov. 19. Butterfield, who was first elected to Congress in a special election in July 2004, is known on Capitol Hill to be a strong advocate for supporting broadband expansion in rural and minority areas and for quality health insurance access for all Americans.“I am happy to pass the chairman’s gavel to my friend and colleague, Rep. Butterfield,” outgoing CBC Chair Marcia Fudge (D-Ohio) said. “He has dedicated his life and career to advancing the priorities of the disenfranchised and overlooked, both in his home state of North Carolina as well as here on the Hill. I congratulate him on his election, and I look forward to supporting him in his new capacity as he continues to move our caucus forward.”Butterfield is the 24th elected chair of the organization and will officially begin his duties on Jan. 6, 2015, when the 114th Congress is sworn in. Butterfield, who has spent most of his public career as a jurist, said that he is humbled by his election.“I’m moved by the unwavering support the CBC has shown me throughout the years,” he said. “Each year they’ve continued to elect me to senior positions within the caucus, solidifying their confidence in me to steer and now lead the conscience of the Congress as chair. I do not take their endorsement lightly.”A native of Wilson, N.C., Butterfield is a graduate of North Carolina Central University and its law school. He served as a Resident Superior Court Judge for the First Judicial Division, presiding over civil and criminal courts in 46 counties.In February 2001, then Gov. Mike Easley (D) appointed Butterfield as an associate justice on the North Carolina Supreme Court. Butterfield authored opinions on such issues as the application of capital punishment, judicial sentencing procedures and eminent domain.Butterfield lost his election bid to the court in November 2002, and he resumed his judicial career as a Superior Court trial judge.Butterfield will have to work with a strongly partisan Republican House of Representatives and President Obama, who is in the last two years of his term. Nevertheless, he feels there are opportunities for the CBC.“The new Congress provides a fresh start to address the issues that are important to all of us,” Butterfield said. “Members of the CBC come from every region of the country. While we each have our own priorities, we speak with a singular, powerful voice in our fight to deliver on the expectations of Americans—to have a government that works for all of us.”In addition to Butterfield, Rep. Yvette Clarke (D-N.Y.) was elected as first vice chair, Rep. Andre Carson (D-Ind.) as second vice chair, Rep. Karen Bass (D-Calif.) as secretary and Rep. Hakeem Jeffries (D-N.Y.) as whip. Butterfield and the elected officers will lead 45 CBC members, the largest number in the organization’s history.Rep. Keith Ellison (D-Minn.) was elected as co-chair of the Congressional Progressive Caucus and Rep. Barbara Lee (D-Calif.), a former CBC Chair, was elected whip and Rep. Sheila Jackson-Lee (D-Texas) got the nod for vice chair and liaison to the CBC. Rep. James Clyburn (D-S.C.), a former CBC Chair, was re-elected as the House Democratic Caucus Assistant Democratic Leader.last_img read more