Dortmund director We dont care what Hoeness thinks

first_imgMichael Zorc believes Uli Hoeness’ claim that Borussia Dortmund are favourites for Saturday’s game against Bayern Munich is irrelevantDortmund head into this weekend’s ‘Der Klassiker’ hoping to maintain their unbeaten start in the Bundesliga and extend their lead at top of the standings.Bayern president Hoeness claimed earlier this week that Dortmund enter the game as the clear favourites.But Dortmund sporting director Zorc is uninterested in what Hoeness thinks.“It doesn’t matter what is being said before such a game,” said Zorc in a press conference on YouTube.borussia dortmund, marco reus, jadon sancho, paco alcacerReport: Dortmund hammer four past Leverkusen George Patchias – September 14, 2019 Borussia Dortmund put four past Bayer Leverkusen.Borussia Dortmund leapfrogged Bayern Munich to claim second place in the Bundesliga. After handing out a 4-0 thrashing of…“The favourites aren’t 1-0 up from the start of the game. Of course, we noticed that (Hoeness’ comments), but we don’t care.“We’re enjoying the situation at the moment and feel we have a good reason to approach the game with confidence.”Dortmund coach Lucien Favre also made it clear that he expects a difficult game against Bayern.The Bundesliga match between Dortmund and Bayern will begin at 18:30 (CEST) at Signal Iduna Park.last_img read more

Time Inc is Really Really Excited About Tablets

first_imgMagazine publishers are jumping on the Apple iPad app bandwagon in droves and arguably for good reason. It’s a sleek, nifty device that not only has captured the attention and imagination (and dollars) of consumers but also is a vibrant new platform for distributing content.At Time Inc.—which already has launched apps for Time and Entertainment Weekly—the vibe among upper management is of sheer enthusiasm. By upper management, I’m referring specifically to CEO Ann Moore. During parent company Time Warner’s “Investor Day” Thursday, Moore updated attendees on the division’s recent performance (it reported an operating income of $50 million during the first quarter 2010, versus a loss of $32 million during the same period last year) and gushed about providing paid content through mobile and portable devices. In addition to the Time and Entertainment Weekly apps, Moore said the company is readying several more from its other magazine brands, including a People app and food, beauty and cleaning apps for Real Simple.Here’s a sampling of soundbites from Moore’s presentation and the Q+A session that followed, in no particular order:At my lunch table today, I was shocked that not one of you had an iPad.We see the next flood of new portable color touchscreens headed to market in the next 18 months as a game changer. It will be the opportunity that content producers like Time Inc have been waiting for to reestablish value for quality digital content. It’s argued that it will be impossible to get consumers to pay for digital content since they’ve grown up getting everything for free. We disagree.It’s become increasingly clear that customers will pay for trusted quality content that’s easy to access and fairly priced.The tablet restores something we lost when we went to the Web. Our readers can once again literally touch our content while still having that familiar “lean back” experience of a magazine. In real time, they can link in instead of linking out to the rest of the story on Time.com.We’ve spent decades perfecting the craft of making magazines. Now we can apply all that experience to the new virtual magazine, letting consumers feast on incredible images … as well as the stories behind them with just a little flick.The advertising can be so good it can become content itself. It can help you evaluate products. And when you’ve made your decision it can help to find you a place to buy them.As more and more hardware manufacturers come in with these e-readers there is just huge demand for our product, for our video product, for my print product—it’ll all be combined. We think very healthy business models will be coming out of it. We’ll be making more money in those businesses than we’ve been making with our traditional dot-coms.We have a great deal of work to do over next 12 to 18 months, to develop business models, evolve products and talk to consumers and advertisers.People are paying. We know people will pay for it … it’s a business model that is just really very delicious.Oh, and one other thing that came up during Time Warner’s Investor Day: the possibility of a Time Inc. sell-off. Company chairman and CEO Jeff Bewkes said (again) that it won’t happen, indicating that it is in an “attractive” position in relation to the competition and in a good growth mode for 2010. “It’s a good business, and we’re good at it,” he said.last_img read more

NBCUniversal streaming service to launch in April

first_img Now playing: Watch this: Share your voice Top 5 unanswered questions about Apple TV Plus 1 50 Photos Comment 2:21 2019 TV shows you can’t miss NBCUniversal is working on its own streaming service.  SOPA Images/Getty NBCUniversal, a streaming service from Comcast, will launch in April, NBCUniversal CEO Steve Burke said during a Comcast earnings call Thursday.The service, which will reportedly be ad-supported, has been expected and caused some consternation among fans of The Office, when it was announced in June that the show would be leaving Netflix for the NBC platform in 2021.There’s no shortage of companies getting into the streaming business. Both Apple and Disney, for instance, are working on platforms. Originally published at 7:09 a.m. PT.Update 7:20 a.m. PT: Adds additional information about streaming platforms. Tags Digital Medialast_img read more

Khaleda will participate in next polls under Hasina

first_imgTofail AhmedCommerce minister Tofail Ahmed said the present government led by prime minister Sheikh Hasina will work as the election time supportive government in the next national polls.”You can write this down in your diaries — I am certain Khaleda Zia will take part in the elections under prime minister Sheikh Hasina,” the minister told journalists at the Secretariat on Monday when government offices resumed after Eid vacation.“The national elections will take place before 29 January, 2019. It will be conducted by the Election Commission under the government of Sheikh Hasina. There is no chance that this will change. If someone does not want to participate in the polls, we cannot force them,” Tofail said in reply to another question.The minister claimed price hike during the Eid season was tolerable. He also said 2500,000 metric tons of rice will be imported from Vietnam, and that will help contain the price hike.last_img read more

How a twoweek army crackdown reignited Myanmars Rohingya crisis

first_imgTAKE WHAT YOU CAN: Rohingya children rummaged last October through the ruins of a village market that was set on fire during the army`s `clearance operation` in Rakhine state. Photo: ReutersIn November, Myanmar’s army swept through Rohingya villages in Rakhine state. Hundreds of Rohingya were killed and some 75,000 fled to Bangladesh. The violence has presented Aung San Suu Kyi with a major crisis.When army helicopters fired on Rahim’s village in northwest Myanmar one day last November, the Rohingya schoolteacher told his pregnant wife to take their three young daughters and leave. He stayed behind with his 72-year-old mother.At dawn the next morning soldiers encircled and then entered the village. Rahim and his mother crept into a rice field. Crouching, Rahim said they saw the soldiers set fire to homes and shoot fleeing villagers.“I thought we were going to die that day,” said Rahim, who like many Rohingya identifies by a single name. “We kept hearing gunshots. I saw several people shot dead.”His account, told in a Bangladesh refugee camp where thousands of Rohingya are sheltering, was corroborated by four people from his village.The attack on Rahim’s village, Dar Gyi Zar, on 12-13 November claimed dozens of lives, Rohingya elders said. The killings marked the start of a two-week military onslaught across about 10 Rohingya villages in northwest Rakhine State, a Reuters reconstruction of events has found.Rohingya elders estimate some 600 people were killed. A United Nations report from February said the likely toll was hundreds. At least 1,500 homes were destroyed, Human Rights Watch satellite imagery shows. Countless women were raped, eyewitnesses and aid workers said. Doctors in Bangladesh told Reuters they treated women who had been raped.It was the latest round of ethnic bloodletting in Myanmar, a majority Buddhist country where the roughly one million Muslim Rohingya are marginalised, often living in camps, denied access to healthcare and education and uprooted and killed in pogroms.Myanmar’s march to democracy, beginning in 2011, uncorked long-suppressed ethnic and religious tensions between Rakhine’s Buddhists and the Rohingya. Clashes between the two communities in 2012 killed at least 192 people and displaced 140,000, mostly Rohingya.This latest eruption of violence drove some 75,000 Rohingya across the border into Bangladesh, the United Nations said. Myanmar’s government has conceded some soldiers may have committed crimes but has rejected charges of “ethnic cleansing.” It has promised to prosecute any officers where there is evidence of wrongdoing.The military assault involving a little under 2,000 soldiers has presented Aung San Suu Kyi with the first major crisis since her party won elections in late 2015. Many hoped Suu Kyi, a Nobel Peace Prize winner, would bring a new era of tolerance after five decades of military rule. While generals remain in control of a significant part of the government, she now faces accusations of failing to oppose human rights abuses.Suu Kyi’s National Security Adviser Thaung Tun said some individuals may have committed abuses “in the heat of the confrontation.” But he stressed the government did not approve of such conduct. Suu Kyi did not respond to detailed questions from Reuters about events in Rakhine.The army began its “clearance operation” in Rakhine after Rohingya militants attacked border posts there on 9 October. For a month, it tried to pressure villagers to hand over the rebels, without success. That approach changed on 12-13 November in Dar Gyi Zar and the neighbouring village Yae Khat Chaung Gwa Son, marking a sharp escalation of the military operation.This article pieces together how events unfolded, drawing on interviews with Rohingya refugees, diplomats, aid workers and Myanmar government officials. Reuters also gained rare access to Myanmar security officials and spoke with a Rohingya militant leader.The reconstruction of the military operation contains previously unreported details about army negotiations with villagers over the insurgents, a shift in military strategy and the army units involved. Reuters also learned new details about investigations into alleged atrocities that are being conducted by Myanmar’s army and by the home affairs ministry.The violence was brutal. A 16-year-old girl assaulted in the village of Kyar Gaung Taung, said two soldiers raped her. Speaking in a Bangladesh refugee camp, she said she still suffers anxiety and trauma after the attack.“I am angry with myself for being Rohingya,” said the teen, whose name Reuters is withholding. “If I had been Bangladeshi or American, I would never have been raped. But they did it to me because I was born Rohingya.”The army has denied there were widespread abuses and said it was carrying out a legitimate counterinsurgency operation. The army and the ministry of home affairs did not respond to detailed questions from Reuters about events in Rakhine.“It is possible that individual security officers or individual policemen may have reacted in an excessive manner,” Thaung Tun, the security adviser, said. “But what we want to make clear is that it’s not the policy of the government to condone these excesses.”After years of persecution, some Rohingya have begun to fight back. A militant group called Harakah al-Yaqin, or “Faith Movement”, was formed by Rohingya living in Saudi Arabia after the 2012 violence, according to the International Crisis Group. Its leader, Ata Ullah, said hundreds of young Rohingya men have joined the ranks of the group, which now wants to be known as the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army. Myanmar’s government estimates it has about 400 fighters.“In 2012, they killed us and we understood at that time, they would not give us our rights,” said Ata Ullah, speaking by video link from an undisclosed location in Myanmar.Before dawn on 9 October, Rohingya militants staged attacks on border police. The army set about trying to capture the rebels. For a month, it attempted to pressure villagers to give up the insurgents, according to Rohingya elders and villagers.The village of Kyet Yoe Pyin, located on the main road north to Bangladesh in northwest Rakhine, was one of the first to draw the army’s attention on 13 October, according to a military intelligence source. Insurgents had used logs to erect roadblocks near the settlement of 1,300 houses, blocking the way for military vehicles, residents and the military intelligence source said.In retaliation, about 400 soldiers burned down a part of Kyet Yoe Pyin and shot several people, according to four villagers. Officials have blamed insurgents and villagers themselves for the burning of homes.After a few days of trying unsuccessfully to capture the insurgents, the soldiers asked village elders to negotiate. The meeting took place in western Kyet Yoe Pyin. About 300 soldiers crowded the road while four commanders led the talks with five Rohingya men, according to a village elder who attended the meeting. The talks, confirmed by the military intelligence source, were an example of the army’s attempts in those early weeks to pressure the villagers to help identify the rebels.“Their first question was: ‘Who cut the trees?’ We told them we didn’t know,” the village elder recounted. “They told us: ‘We will give you a chance: You can either give us the names of the insurgents, or we will kill you’.”The officers visited Kyet Yoe Pyin on several further occasions, asking about insurgents and taking money in exchange for leaving the remaining houses untouched, the villagers said. A variation of this scene was repeated in other villages in the weeks leading up to 12 November, residents said.FAR FROM HOME: Kutupalang Unregistered Refugee Camp in Bangladesh, where Rohingya refugees live. Photo: ReutersTWO WEEKSOn 12 November, this low-grade violence escalated abruptly when the army clashed with rebels north of two villages in northwestern Rakhine – Rahim’s village Dar Gyi Zar, a settlement of more than 400 houses, and Yae Khat Chaung Gwa Son, with some 600 houses.Muhammad Ismail, another Rohingya teacher from Dar Gyi Zar, said the army spotted insurgents a few kilometres to the north of his village at around 4:00am. After a two-hour shootout, the militants fled towards neighbouring Yae Khat Chaung Gwa Son, where fighting resumed in the afternoon. The area is densely forested, and residents could not say how many militants there were.The leader of the insurgents, Ata Ullah, said he and his men found themselves surrounded. “We had to fight,” he told Reuters. He did not say how many insurgents were involved in the clash.During a day-long battle, some villagers joined the insurgents, fighting the security forces with knives and sticks, according to Ata Ullah and the military. A senior officer was killed and the army brought in two helicopters mounted with guns as back-up, according to official accounts, which described the incident as an ambush by the insurgents.The helicopters swooped in around 4:00pm, hovering low over the road connecting Dar Gyi Zar and Yae Khat Chaung Gwa Son, according to eyewitnesses. The villagers dispersed in panic as one of the helicopters sprayed the insurgents with bullets. The other helicopter fired indiscriminately on those fleeing, five eyewitnesses said. The military intelligence source confirmed that the helicopters dispersed the crowd but denied they shot at civilians.It marked the start of an offensive across a section of northwest Rakhine that lasted about two weeks, according to villagers, aid workers and human rights monitors and a review of satellite imagery from Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International. Security and administrative officials confirmed the scope of the sweep but said they were not aware of abuses.Whole communities fled north towards larger villages and then west to Bangladesh, pursued by the army. Women who were raped said the soldiers shouted “go to Bangladesh.”Three doctors from small clinics near refugee camps in Bangladesh have described treating some three dozen cases of Rohingya women whom they say were raped.“I treated one woman. She was so badly raped she had lost sensation in her lower limbs,” said John Sarkar, 40, a Bangladeshi doctor who has worked with Rohingya refugees for eight years.National Security Adviser Thaung Tun said a commission, set up by Suu Kyi in December and chaired by vice president Myint Swe, a former head of military intelligence, needed time to investigate.“We find it really difficult to believe that the Myanmar military would use (sexual violence) as a tool, sex slaves or rape as a weapon. In Myanmar this is repulsive, it’s not acceptable,” he said.The Suu Kyi appointed investigation is one of several. The army is conducting an internal probe and the ministry of home affairs, which is controlled by the army, is also carrying out an inquiry. Separately, the United Nations has ordered a fact-finding mission to examine allegations of human rights abuses.A senior government source and a senior military source said the commander of the army division that led the operation, major general Khin Maung Soe, had been questioned by investigators in the army probe. The army did not respond to Reuters questions about Khin Maung Soe’s role and Reuters was unable to contact him directly.The ministry of home affairs, meanwhile, is examining 21 cases, including five suspected murders, six rapes, two cases of looting and one case of arson and seven unexplained deaths, according to police colonel Shwe Thaung. Investigators were seeking the army’s cooperation to interrogate soldiers.IN NEED: Rohingya refugees sat at the roadside in February hoping to get money from passersby near Kutupalang Makeshift Refugee Camp in Cox`s Bazar, Bangladesh. Photo: ReutersLEFT BEHINDWhen the sun went down on the villages of Dar Gyi Zar and Yae Khat Chaung Gwa Son on 12 November, the fighting stopped. “The night was tense. Some people sneaked out to neighbouring villages. Others were preparing to move first thing in the morning,” said Muhammad Ismail, the Rohingya teacher who witnessed fighting.But at dawn the next day, soldiers encircled the two villages and set the houses on fire, five eyewitnesses said.Those who could, fled. But the elderly and the infirm stayed. From the rice field where he hid, Rahim said he saw soldiers shooting indiscriminately.Police reports from the period confirm that security forces focused their attention on about 10 villages – Dar Gyi Zar, Yae Khat Chaung Gwa Son and other settlements nearby. They detained nearly 400 people between 12 and 30 November, according to a senior administrator in the state capital of Sittwe who received the daily dispatches.The administrator, who briefed Reuters on condition of anonymity, said the reports described a lawful counterinsurgency operation.One of the villages that bore the brunt of the post-12-November crackdown was Kyar Gaung Taung, a settlement of about 300 houses in northwest Rakhine.Residents say that for five days starting around 16 November, security forces swooped in, searching for men. As in neighbouring villages, they arrested or killed most working-age men, and gathered the women in groups, carrying out invasive body searches.Reuters talked to 17 people from Kyar Gaung Taung from November through March by telephone and in person in Bangladeshi camps, including five rape victims, three close relatives of those raped and several village elders. They corroborated one another’s accounts.Shamshida, a 30-year-old mother of six, was ordered to come out of her house.“One of the soldiers put a machete to my chest and bit me on the back. Then, they started picking women from the group gathered on the road. I was selected and pulled inside the house. I knelt down thinking that may help and the last thing I remember was one of the soldiers kicking me in the head,” said Shamshida, who identifies with a single name.When her husband and her sister found her several hours later, she was stripped naked, unconscious, covered in bruises and bleeding from her mouth and her vagina.They carried her to the neighbouring village of U Shey Kya several hundred metres away, where she regained consciousness, was showered and taken care of by a village doctor.After eight days, she returned to her village, where there were no men left and many houses were burned down.Doctors in Bangladesh said the Rohingya women they treated had torn vaginal tissue and scars inside their mouths from having guns inserted. In some cases, the women couldn’t walk and had to be carried by relatives to the clinics. Many were covered in bruises and bite marks.Sarkar, the Bangladeshi doctor, and others administered abortion-inducing kits, painkillers and antibiotics. In cases where the kits didn’t work, they referred the women to regional hospitals for abortions.As thousands of Rohingya were fleeing across the river border to Bangladesh, Suu Kyi was not in the country. In early December she went to Singapore, attending meetings and a ceremony to have a purple orchid named after her in the city-state’s botanic gardens.Suu Kyi’s defenders, including some Western diplomats, say she is hamstrung by a military-drafted constitution that left the army in control of key security ministries and much of the apparatus of the state. Suu Kyi may be playing a long game, these diplomats said – back the military for now and coax the generals into accepting a rewriting of the constitution to reduce their power.During her trip, Suu Kyi gave an interview to state broadcaster Channel News Asia, in which she accused the international community of “always drumming up cause for bigger fires of resentment,” adding it didn’t help “if everybody is just concentrating on the negative side of the situation.” She appealed for understanding of her nation’s ethnic complexities, and said the world should not forget that the military operation was launched in response to the Rohingya insurgents’ attacks on border posts.Rahim, the village schoolteacher, and his family were among thousands of Rohingya who made the 2 kilometer (1.2 mile) river crossing to Bangladesh.On 8 April, in a Bangladesh refugee camp, Rahim’s wife Rasheda gave birth to their first boy, Futu, or “little son.” Rahim doesn’t know whether Futu will ever see his homeland.last_img