Newly inducted as a Virtuoso luxury member Los An

first_imgNewly inducted as a Virtuoso luxury member, Los Angeles Tourism & Convention Board (LA Tourism) attended Luxperience with The Line Hotel and Mondrian Los Angeles. This marked the first time hotel partners joined the LA Tourism booth, bringing to life the destination’s luxury hotel offerings for travel buyers.Among LA’s wide range of accommodation options, luxury and unique properties can be found in various neighbourhoods. Mondrian Los Angeles showcased the Sunset Strip’s classic glamour and excitement in the form of a luxury boutique hotel. Moving towards the hip region of Downtown LA, buyers had the chance to learn about The Line Hotel, a collaboration by the Sydell Group with local influencers Roy Choi, The Houston Brothers, Sean Knibb and art and design collective Poketo.Los Angeles is experiencing a surge of hotel development and growth at the moment, with 24 new hotels under construction and another 28 in final planning stages countywide. These 52 hotel projects will deliver more than 9200 new hotels rooms to the LA area in the next few years.Australia is LA’s number two overseas market with 430,000 Australian visiting LA in 2015, representing an increase of 7.3 per cent over the past year. It is also LA’s number one hotel lodging market.last_img read more

Top stories Ebola outbreak challenges Viking cats and a new kind of

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country (left to right): JOHN WESSELS/AFP/GETTY IMAGES; ASTRID GAST/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM; ISTOCK.COM/BRAUNS Ebola vaccine is having ‘major impact’ but worries about DRC outbreak growConcerns about an Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo that surfaced in August are growing. Although communities seem to be responding well after more than 40,000 people received an experimental vaccine for the disease, the outbreak in the northeastern region of the country is in an area that has long suffered from armed conflict, which repeatedly has brought Ebola response teams to a halt.Viking cat skeletons reveal a surprising growth in the size of felines over time Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Top stories: Ebola outbreak challenges, Viking cats, and a new kind of placebo By Frankie SchembriDec. 14, 2018 , 12:20 PM Many animals shrink when they become domesticated, but a curious thing appears to have happened to cats during the Viking era: They got bigger. By examining Denmark’s feline fossil record, researchers found domesticated cats grew on average by about 16% between the Viking Age and today. The researchers suspect the cats’ growth was related to a plentiful supply of food from growing villages.Just thinking you have poor endurance genes changes your bodyIn a study examining what may be a novel form of the placebo response, psychologists have found that just telling a person they have a high or low genetic risk for certain physical traits can influence how their body functions when exercising or eating—regardless of what genetic variant they actually have.NIH says cancer study also hit by fetal tissue banA team investigating cancer immunotherapy is the third laboratory affected by President Donald Trump’s administration’s order telling scientists at the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) to stop acquiring new human fetal tissue for experiments. Last week, two experiments investigating HIV and eye diseases, respectively, were put on hold. The order is now being reviewed by the Department of Health and Human Services, which oversees NIH.After botched launch, orbiting atomic clocks confirm Einstein’s theory of relativityTwo teams of physicists have used data from misguided satellites to put Albert Einstein’s theory of gravity, the general theory of relativity, to an unexpected test. The opportunistic experiment confirms to unprecedented precision a key prediction of the theory—that time ticks slower near a massive body like Earth than it does farther away.last_img read more