Samsung The Wall Luxury Micro LED TV coming in July for rich

first_imgThe modular design of The Wall Luxury’s Micro LED panels allow TVs from 73 up to 292 inches. Samsung Samsung’s The Wall TV is finally going to be available for consumers to purchase. At least those wealthy enough to afford its still unknown, but likely insanely expensive, price tag. Available globally in July, The Wall Luxury is Samsung’s first consumer Micro LED display. The scalable, modular technology can be configured and customized to a variety of sizes, from 73-inches in 2K (a.k.a. 1080p) resolution all the way up to 292-inches in 8K resolution — assuming your room and budget can support adding the additional panels.  Comments TVs Samsung 3 Samsung MicroLED TV comes closer to reality in 75-inch… Samsung The Frame UN55LS003AF 1:48 Preview •center_img The Wall Luxury incorporates design-centric features from other Samsung TVs. Like the Frame, The Wall isn’t meant to be turned off. Instead, Samsung says, it changes “into a digital canvas best matching the owner`s interior needs and personal mood.” The display runs a version of Samsung’s Ambient mode found on its 2019 QLED TVs that shows curated art, photos and videos, complete with optional digital frames.Samsung says the product will be sold through its “Custom Installer Network” and those looking for pricing information should contact them. For context, Samsung’s QLED-based TVs max out at $70,000 for a 98-inch 8K version, so it’s safe to assume that The Wall Luxury will cost well into six figures, at least for the larger 4K and 8K sizes.the-wall-luxury3Instead of powering off, Samsung’s The Wall Luxury television can turn into a digital picture frame when not in use.  Samsung The first new screen technology in a decade, MicroLED utilizes millions of tiny, inorganic LEDs packed together to create the image. It has the potential for the same perfect black levels as OLED with no danger of burn-in. It can deliver higher brightness than any current display technology, wide-gamut excellent color and doesn’t suffer the viewing angle and uniformity issues of LCD. The Wall Luxury features a brightness of 2,000 nits, higher than all but the brightest LCD TVs available today, for improved HDR image quality. Samsung mentions a “120Hz video rate,” although it’s unclear whether that’s the same as the 120Hz refresh rate used by high-end 4K TVs. Samsung’s AI Upscaling is also present through what the company calls its “Quantum Processor Flex,” which uses machine learning to calibrate the picture regardless of The Wall’s modular screen resolution.The Wall Luxury has a panel depth of 30mm, an improvement on the 80mm depth of the earlier version of The Wall that was only available for the commercial market. Despite the depth improvement, however, a Samsung representative told CNET that The Wall Luxury doesn’t use the next-generation version of MicroLED tech shown at CES 2019. That version uses even smaller LEDs, managing to eke 4K resolution out of a 75-inch size. There’s no word on when Samsung will bring that version to market. Tags 31 Photos Meet Samsung’s modular and massive MicroLED TVs at CES Compared to OLED and LCD, one disadvantage of current MicroLED technology is resolution. At 73 inches and 2K/1080p resolution, the individual pixels of The Wall Luxury are significantly larger than those of a typical 75-inch 4K LCD or 77-inch 4K OLED TV, so the image won’t be as detailed with 4K TV shows and movies, in particular from relatively close seating distances. The same goes for higher-resolution; Samsung sells QLED TVs with 8K resolution as small as 65 inches, while to get that resolution in MicroLED you’ll need, yes, a 292-inch TV.Update June 13: Added more pricing information.  Share your voice Now playing: Watch this:last_img read more

Einsteins green refrigerator making a comeback

first_imgIn 1930, Einstein and Leo Szilard designed a refrigerator that required no electricity and had no moving parts. While almost everybody knows how Einstein revolutionized physics with his theories of relativity, many people may not know that the great scientist had a domestic side, too. Well, sort of – in 1930, Einstein and his former student Leo Szilard designed a refrigerator that required no electricity and had no moving parts. However, as refrigerator technology became more efficient, Einstein’s design was nearly forgotten. Citation: Einstein’s green refrigerator making a comeback (2008, September 25) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-09-einstein-green-refrigerator-comeback.html Now, Malcolm McCulloch, an electrical engineer at Oxford, is trying to bring Einstein’s refrigerator back. McCulloch explains that the design is environmentally friendly and could prove especially useful in developing countries, where demand for cooling appliances is quickly increasing.McCulloch’s team has recently built a prototype of Einstein and Szilard’s refrigerator. Instead of compressing man-made greenhouse gases called freons, as typical refrigerators do, the prototype uses pressurized gas to keep items cold. The refrigerator just requires a way to heat the liquids, and McCulloch has been working on developing a solar energy system to meet this requirement.The refrigerator is based on the idea that liquids boil at low temperatures when the surrounding air pressure is low. “If you go to the top of Mount Everest, water boils at a much lower temperature than it does when you´re at sea level, and that´s because the pressure is much lower up there,” McCulloch said.In their refrigerator prototype, the scientists filled a flask with liquid butane (which is also commonly sold as a liquid in cigarette lighters and as a gas for cooking). Then the scientists introduced a new vapor to decrease the air pressure, which decreases the liquid boiling temperature, causing the butane to boil. As the butane boils, it takes energy from the surroundings, and lowers the temperature inside the refrigerator. Although Einstein and Szilard´s original design was not as efficient as the freon refrigerators that replaced them, McCulloch plans to improve the design by using different kinds of gases. He predicts these improvements could quadruple the refrigerator´s efficiency. The fact that the refrigerator has no moving parts could also be advantageous, he explains, as it would require minimal maintenance and so could be particularly useful in rural areas. McCulloch emphasizes that the refrigerator is still just a prototype, but he hopes to one day commercialize it. The work is part of his team’s three-year project to develop robust appliances that can be used in locations without electricity.via: The Guardian This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more