Bosch built a sensor platform just for flying taxis

first_img Share your voice All of the electric urban aircraft unveiled at Uber Elevate 2018 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better Enlarge ImageThis little box is all Bosch thinks flying taxis will need to operate the sensors required for autonomous flight. Bosch Flying taxis are a growing area of interest as congestion continues to get worse. Bosch is a supplier with its hands all over the automotive industry, and now, it wants to get into the flying-taxi game by leveraging its current strengths and applying them to a burgeoning field.Bosch on Tuesday unveiled its new sensor platform, which is aimed specifically at air taxis — small, short-distance aircraft that will likely operate without human assistance. Using its knowledge from developing sensor platforms for automated development cars, Bosch has combined a batch of sensors on a single platform that the supplier believes will be able to give air-taxi development the parts it needs without the insane cost usually dedicated to aerospace tech.The supplier says the system is plug-and-play, which means it should be able to integrate into a number of existing flying-taxi systems without too many complications. Bosch didn’t give a full listing of every sensor built into the platform, but it did call out a few: Acceleration sensors track movement, yaw-rate sensors determine angle of attack, magnetic field sensors monitor its heading, and pressure sensors measure altitude and airspeed. “Through our Bosch solution, we aim to make civil aviation with flying taxis affordable for a wide range of providers,” said Marcus Parentis, who heads Bosch’s team in charge of these control units, in a statement. “We are talking to air taxi manufacturers from the aerospace and automotive industries, as well as with startups that build air vehicles and are looking to provide sharing services.”We still have a way to go before flying taxis even get approval to take off — the FAA does not mess around, after all — but Bosch believes they’re definitely a part of our future. It pointed to analysis from Morgan Stanley consultants that claims the flying-taxi market could be as high as $1.5 trillion by 2040. Sounds a little lofty, but hey, we may as well aim high. 2020 Kia Telluride review: Kia’s new SUV has big style and bigger value Post a comment 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous More From Roadshow Tags Auto Tech Future Cars 8 Photos 0 Boschlast_img read more

Trump threatens to devastate Turkey economy over Kurds

first_imgTurkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan (L) and US president Donald Trum (R)US president Donald Trump warned Turkey on Sunday of economic devastation if it attacks Kurdish forces in the wake of the US troop pullout from Syria, while also urging the Kurds not to “provoke” Ankara.Trump took to Twitter to reveal some of his latest thoughts in the slow drip-drip of information being released by his administration after his shocking December announcement of the troop withdrawal.His top diplomat Mike Pompeo is on a whirlwind regional tour aimed at reassuring allies amid rising tensions between the US and Turkey over the fate of Washington’s Syrian Kurdish allies in the fight against the Islamic State group.Pompeo also sought to reassure Washington’s Kurdish allies in the fight against IS, who fear the departure of American troops would allow Turkey to attack them.Turkey had reacted angrily to suggestions that Trump’s plan to withdraw troops was conditional on the safety of the US-backed Kurdish fighters, seen by the Turkish government as terrorists.”Will devastate Turkey economically if they hit Kurds,” Trump tweeted, while pushing for the creation of a 20-mile (30-kilometer) “safe zone.””Likewise, do not want the Kurds to provoke Turkey.”Trump did not detail who would create, enforce or pay for the safe zone, or where it would be located.US-led operations against IS in Syria have been spearheaded on the ground by the Kurdish-dominated Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF).Ankara sees the backbone of that alliance, the Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG), as a terrorist group linked to the Kurdistan Worker’s Party (PKK) which has fought a decades-long insurgency against the Turkish state.On Saturday, more than 600 people were evacuated from the remaining IS holdout in eastern Syria, a monitor said, as US-backed fighters prepare for a final assault on the area.”Starting the long overdue pullout from Syria while hitting the little remaining ISIS territorial caliphate hard, and from many directions. Will attack again from existing nearby base if it reforms,” Trump said.”Russia, Iran and Syria have been the biggest beneficiaries of the long term US policy of destroying ISIS in Syria – natural enemies. We also benefit but it is now time to bring our troops back home. Stop the ENDLESS WARS!”Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights head Rami Abdel Rahman said that several dozen jihadist fighters were among those evacuated to areas held by the Kurdish-Arab alliance.Abdel Rahman said some 16,000 people, including 760 IS fighters, have fled the area since the start of December, though this marked the first time the SDF and the coalition provided buses, suggesting a deal struck between the warring sides.Civilians still trappedThe United Nations said Friday that overall some 25,000 people have fled the violence over the last six months as the die-hard jihadists have battled to defend their dwindling bastions.An estimated 2,000 civilians remain trapped in the area around the town of Hajin, the United Nations said.The US-led coalition on Saturday fired over 20 missiles against jihadist positions, the Observatory said.The monitor said some 300 SDF combatants had deployed near the village of Sousa in preparations for a final assault.last_img read more