Trump to let US firms sell tech to Huawei

first_img Post a comment US firms can again deal with Huawei. Óscar Gutiérrez/CNET President Donald Trump agreed Saturday to lift some restrictions against US companies selling high-tech gear to Chinese telecom giant Huawei, says a report. “We’re talking about equipment where there’s not a great national-emergency problem with it,” Trump said after a meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping, according to The Wall Street Journal.In May, Trump signed an executive order essentially banning Huawei because of national security concerns that the company is too closely tied to the Chinese government and that its gear could be used to spy on other countries and companies. Huawei has repeatedly said those fears are unfounded. More on Huawei Tags Mobile Security Huawei ban: Full timeline on how and why its phones are under fire Trump could use Huawei ban as leverage for US-China trade deal US companies reportedly bypassing Trump ban on sales to Huawei Huawei says Trump’s ban will hurt US 5G deployment FCC commissioner wants Huawei gear out of US networkscenter_img The easing of restrictions is part of a general cease fire on trade reached between Trump and Xi during a meeting on the sidelines of a Group 20 meeting. Trump said the deal to restart talks would see the US delaying added tariffs on Chinese products in return for China buying American farm goods. It’s not yet clear exactly what Huawei restrictions will be lifted. “We’re going to work with China on where we left off to see if we can make a deal,” Trump reportedly said during a news conference. The president said he’d hold off on the Huawei issue until the end of negotiations, the Journal said.John Neuffer, president of the Semiconductor Industry Association, a trade group for makers of chips for computers, phones and other equipment, told the Journal he needed more details on what Huawei can now buy from member companies. He added, though, that he’s “encouraged the talks are restarting and additional tariffs are on hold.”Unnamed sources told the Journal that US national security officials have been exploring ways of narrowing the Huawei prohibitions so they pinpoint sales of US gear used in “chokepoints,” places where the Chinese company’s tech could control wireless networks. Security experts have voiced concern about foreign powers disrupting US communications networks, especially during a national emergency.Originally published June 28, 9:44 a.m. PT.Update, 10:20 a.m.: Adds mention of concern about “chokepoints.” Share your voice 0 Huaweilast_img read more

US vows to make North Korea rich if it gives up nukes

first_imgUS Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, left, shakes hands with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un during a meeting at Workers` Party of Korea headquarters in Pyongyang, North Korea on 9 May. Photo: APThe United States promised Friday that it would work to rebuild North Korea’s sanctions-crippled economy if Kim Jong Un’s regime agrees to surrender its nuclear arsenal.Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s vow came as senior US officials expressed growing optimism ahead of the landmark 12 June summit between Kim and president Donald Trump.Pompeo, who held talks Pyongyang’s young leader over the weekend, even said “we have a pretty good understanding between our two countries about what the shared objectives are.”He was speaking after talks with his South Korean opposite number Foreign Minister Kang Kyung-wha to coordinate Washington and Seoul’s preparations for the historic encounter.Many observers have warned Kim’s regime will try to drive a wedge between the allies as the summit approaches, playing Seoul’s fear of war against Washington’s nuclear concerns.But both Kang and Pompeo insisted that they agreed on the need for the “total, permanent and verifiable” denuclearization of the divided peninsula.Trump and South Korea’s President Moon Jae-in are due to meet on 22 May at the White House for the next round of planning.Pompeo said the United States would remain on board to help develop the North’s economy, which has been devastated by its own mismanagement and crippling international sanctions.“If North Korea takes bold action to quickly denuclearize, the United States is prepared to work with North Korea to achieve prosperity on par with our South Korean friends,” he said.Since an ad hoc 1953 armistice put an end to active hostilities between the North and the South, South Korea has emerged from devastation to become a leading world economy.‘Good conversations’But the North has remained one of the world’s most isolated states and its outdated economy has been further battered by a UN-backed “maximum pressure” campaign of sanctions.Over the past year Kim and Trump have added a personal touch to a half-century of international enmity, swapping insults and both openly threatening devastating direct military action.Kim’s regime also carried out missile tests that convinced US intelligence officials, including Pompeo in his former role as CIA chief, that North Korea could threaten US cities.But South Korea’s president Moon reached out to the North, reopening direct talks, and when Kim invited Trump to a summit to discuss disarmament the mood changed.Pompeo flew to Pyongyang for talks and to recover three released American detainees, and now a summit date has been set for 12 June in Singapore.“We had good conversations, conversations that involve deep complex problems, challenges, strategic decisions that chairman Kim has before him,” Pompeo said.The pair, he said, talked “about how it is he wishes to proceed and if he’s prepared, in exchange for the assurances that we’re ready to provide him, if he is prepared to fully denuclearize.“We’ll require a robust verification program, one that we would undertake with partners around the world which would achieve that outcome,” he warned.But he added: “I’m confident that we have a shared understanding of the outcome that the leaders want, certainly President Trump and chairman Kim, but I think President Moon as well.”South Korea’s Kang shared in Pompeo’s optimism and was at pains to insist that there is no daylight between how Washington and Seoul are approaching the talks.“We agreed that the summit would be an historic opportunity for resolving the North Korean nuclear issue, and securing enduring peace on the Korean peninsula,” she said.“We reaffirmed that our goal is to achieve the complete, verifiable and irreversible denuclearization on the Korean Peninsula,” she added, promising “air-tight” coordination.Carrot and stickPompeo’s promise of an economic carrot to match the stick of “maximum pressure” may reassure observers who are concerned that Seoul and Washington’s objectives are not exactly aligned.“There’s a danger here of the peace track moving more quickly than the denuclearization track,” warned Abraham Denmark, an Asia expert and former senior US defence official.“If that happens, it could give North Korea an opportunity to try to drive a wedge between Seoul and Washington,” said Denmark, now at the Wilson Centre think tank in the US capital.Former secretary of state Condoleezza Rice offered three recommendations to Trump: allow experts to make the deal, don’t negotiate away the “equities” of others including Japan and South Korea, and “don’t be anxious to remove American troops from the equation.”“If we can hold to those three principles, this might work,” Rice said at Stanford’s Hoover Institution.So far, the North Korean regime has made vague pledges to “denuclearize” but has not spelled out what that means, when it would happen or how it would be implemented.In North Korea’s bombastic rhetoric, “denuclearization” has, for years, been a byword for US troop withdrawals from South Korea-an idea that Kang appeared to reject.After her talks with Pompeo, she took pains to “emphasize again that the US military presence in Korea is a matter for the ROK-US alliance first and foremost.”Hardliners in the North are believed to see a nuclear weapon as a guarantee against outside efforts to topple the regime, but Trump insists he will not tolerate their growing arsenal.last_img

May faces ministerial resignations threat over Brexit

first_imgTheresa MayPrime minister Theresa May faced the threat Tuesday of more ministerial resignations over her refusal to rule out the possibility of Britain crashing out of the European Union without a deal on 29 March.Three junior ministers penned a letter in the Daily Mail urging May to delay Brexit if she fails to win concessions from Brussels over the withdrawal terms.The warning comes after three more senior ministers published a similar letter over the weekend.”We implore the government to take that step this week,” the ministers said in Tuesday’s letter.”All of us were agreed that we couldn’t be part of a government that allowed the country to leave the EU without a deal,” one of the three, culture and media minister Margot James, told BBC radio.”As D-day approaches, I think we felt honour-bound to actually do something to help prevent such catastrophe.”The letter was also signed by business minister Richard Harrington and energy minister Claire Perry.”We must act immediately to ensure that we are not swept over the precipice on 29 March,” they wrote.”The way to do that is to seek a short extension to Article 50 to allow the negotiations to be completed, the legislation to pass and for the panic that businesses face to subside.”The Daily Mail said 23 Conservative “dissidents” secretly met on Monday to plot strategy.’Free debate’It said that as many as 15 ministers were “said to be ready to resign”.May’s effective number two David Lidington told BBC radio that the British leader would hold a “free debate” with her cabinet members before addressing parliament on Tuesday afternoon.But he refused to confirm multiple British newspaper reports saying May would propose a short Brexit date extension if her EU divorce deal fails to win parliamentary backing by 12 March.May has repeatedly pushed back another vote on her EU divorce deal after her first attempt to get it through parliament suffered a record defeat on 15 January.”I am not going to predict what the PM will say later today,” Lidington said.The rebel ministers are all backing a proposed parliamentary amendment that would force May to set a new Brexit date if she fails to get better terms on the disputed issue of the Irish border.”The colleagues you talk about are good colleagues, effective ministers, and I think it’s important that the Tory party remains a broad church,” Lidington said when asked if the ministers who backed the delay amendment could be dismissed.last_img read more

The Carter School of Music Annual Benefit Concert

first_imgThe Carter School of Music presents the Annual Benefit Concert on September 10 at 5 p.m. this year’s tribute is to Dr. Audrey McCallum. Admission is free however we are asking for a free will offering.last_img